Poshan

photos

Debarshi Dasgupta

The compound also houses many lesser-known plants of Rajasthan, including medicinal ones.

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

…and another on puppets.

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

To further its depiction of folk traditions from the desert, it has a section on music instruments…

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

The museum also showcases different types of grass used in making brooms.

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

A worn out broom is rarely thrown away. This one is being re-used to clean the cooking area.

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

Here’s one that is made from daab grass that is considered auspicious and is used in cleaning places of worship and those associated with food. In many places in Rajasthan, a broom is worshiped as Lakshmi and the state has a separate god and goddess of brooms.

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

The museum showcases many unique brooms like the one with a bell (shown above) and those that can be used only while sitting on one’s haunches.

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

Even the city dweller’s plastic broom finds a place on the museum’s shelf.

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

Often the brooms are adorned with artistic weaving to hold them together instead of conventional tin cases or rubber strips. The brooms, as a common denominator, serve as a window into the lifestyle and traditions of the people associated with it.

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

A collection of different brooms made using different material from the date palm tree.

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

Feminine brooms are more flexible and always used indoors.

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

The museum is housed around a courtyard that grows some of the grasses used in making brooms. In the picture is a panni shrub, commonly used by Banjaras to make brooms.

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

Those used outside are always male and are made from hard twigs given that they have to often clean small pebbles and other relatively heavier refuse. The masculine word for a broom in Marwari is bungra and a feminine one is bungri.

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

The museum houses about 150 different kinds of brooms, each of them collected from makers and users in Rajasthan. They have been divided according to their gender – those used outside are male and those inside are female.

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

The museum is located is located in Moklawas, a small village about 20 kilometres away from Jodhpur. It was surrounded by an arid landscape, much of which has been greened using harvested rainwater from a nearby pond

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

Arnna-Jharna: The Desert Museum was conceived by noted ethnologist Padma Bhushan Komal Kothari, who imagined it as a museum that celebrates living traditions and not one that archives relics.

Photo by Debarshi Dasgupta/ Outlook

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