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Asif Ali Zardari

Former Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari arrives to appear in a court in Karachi, Pakistan. The Pakistani court has extended temporary bail for Zardari and his sister in a multimillion-dollar money laundering case amid increasing political turmoil.

AP/PTI Photo

Leader of the Pakistan's People's party, PPP, Bilawal Bhutto Zardari, center left, gives the victory sign to his supporters while his father and former President of Pakistan Asif Ali Zardari, center right, waves, during an opposition rally in Islamabad, Pakistan. Bilawal said that the PPP will not let society move towards extremism.

AP/PTI

Asif Ali Zardari and Bilawal Bhutto commemorate their party’s founder, 2017.

Photograph by Alamy

Pakistan's newly-elected Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, right, receives flowers from Asifa Bhutto, daughter of Benazir Bhutto at the Presidential Palace after taking oath of prime minister in Islamabad, Pakistan. Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari seen on left.

AP/ PTI

In this photo released by Press Information Department, President of Pakistan Asif Ali Zardari administers the oath to newly-elected Prime Minister of Pakistan Nawaz Sharif at the Presidential Palace in Islamabad.

AP Photo/Press Information Department

A man walks next to huge portraits of Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, right, and Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari, left, displayed near the presidency in Islamabad, Pakistan. Keqiang will arrive in Islamabad on a two day official visit to hold talks with Pakistani leadership to discuss international, regional issues and enhance co-operation in bilateral ties.

AP/PTI

Zardari on Benazir’s fourth death anniversary

AFP (From Outlook 06 May 2013)

Defying a threat of sanctions, Pakistan and Iran inaugurate work for a 780-km section of a gas pipeline. This much-delayed section, in Pak, to cost $1.5 bn of which Iran will dole out $500 mn. US livid.

Britain's Prime minister David Cameron hosts a trilateral meeting with President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan and President Asif Ali Zardari of Pakistan as they symbolically shake hands together at Chequers, near Wendover, England.

AP Photo / David Parker, Pool

Sorit

Vandemataram Samiti workers burn a Pakistani flag to protest the killing of two Indian soldiers on the border, in Varanasi.

PTI Photo

Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari (C) with Lok Sabha speaker Meira Kumar (R) with Fahmida Mirza, Pakistan's speaker of National Assembly at the Sixth Conference of the Association of SAARC Speakers and Parliamentarians in Islamabad on Sunnday.

PTI Photo

Strictly business Pakistan president Asif Ali Zardari, foreign minister Hina Rabbani Khar, and Bilawal Bhutto Zardari at the NAM summit in Tehran

AFP (From Outlook 08 October 2012)

Asif Ali Zardari, President of Pakistan, addresses the 67th session of the United Nations General Assembly with a photo of Pakistan's late Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto next to him at U.N. headquarters. Pakistan once again resorted to its old tactics of raking up Kashmir in the United Nations when its President Asif Ali Zardari sought a solution to the issue under UN resolution, which India considers outdated.

AP Photo/ Frank Franklin II

External Affairs Minister SM Krishna, accompanied by his delegation, meeting Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari in Islamabad.

PTI Photo by Subhav Shukla

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh shakes hands with Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari during a meeting in Tehran, Iran.

PTI Photo/Atul Yadav

Newly elected Prime Minister of Pakistan, Raja Pervez Ashraf, right, takes oath from President of Pakistan Asif Ali Zardari at Presidential Palace in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Press Information Department

Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari, center, is shown the way by his Chinese counterpart Hu Jintao after they inspect a guard of honor during a welcoming ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing.

AP Photo/ Andy Wong

Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani (c) makes his way to the Supreme Court for a hearing in Islamabad. The Supreme Court convicted Gilani of contempt for refusing to reopen an old corruption case against President Asif Ali Zardari but spared him a prison term in a case that has stoked political tensions in the country.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Sorit

Pakistani and Indian officials wave at the plane carrying Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari as it prepares to take off from the Palam Airfield in New Delhi for Jaipur, India,

AP Photo/Saurabh Das

Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari waves after offering prayers at the Ajmer Sharif, the shrine of Sufi saint Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti, in Ajmer, 400 kilometers (250 miles) southwest of New Delhi. Zardari, who is on a one-day personal trip to India, visited the shrine and earlier attended a lunch with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.

AP Photo/Manish Swarup

Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari, front left, and his son Bilawal Bhutto Zardari, front right, gesture as India's Parliamentary Affairs Minister Pawan Kumar Bansal greets them after their arrival at the Palam Airfield in New Delhi.

AP Photo/Saurabh Das

Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari, left, shakes hands with PM Manmohan Singh prior to their meeting at the latter's residence in New Delhi. Zardari arrived in India on a private trip that also gives him a chance to meet Indian leaders amid a thaw in relations between the two South Asian rivals.

AP Photo/Prakash Singh, Pool

Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari, center, holds the hands of Afghan President Hamid Karzai, left, and Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad after their joint news conference at the President House in Islamabad, Pakistan. The Afghan president says "impediments" in ties between Kabul and Islamabad must soon be removed so that progress can be made in peace talks to end the war in Afghanistan.

AP/PTI

A man walks past pictures of, from left, Pakistan's Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani, Afghan President Hamid Karzai, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmedinejad and Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari, displayed outside the Parliament in Islamabad, Pakistan. The Presidents of Afghanistan and Iran convened in Pakistan for a three-way summit that is expected to focus on specific steps Islamabad can take to facilitate peace talks with the Afghan Taliban. The translation of Arabic inscription is "There is no God only Allah, Muhammad is the messenger of Allah."

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Aseefa Bhutto Zardari, center left, daughter of Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari, far left, presents the medal for the Benazir Bhutto Shaheed Award for Democracy to Myanmar's pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi after their meeting at her home in Yangon, Myanmar. Suu Kyi has become the first recipient of the new award instituted by the ruling Pakistan People's Party.

AP/PTI

Myanmar president Thein Sein (L) welcomes Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari at presidential house, in Naypyitaw, Myanmar.

AP Photo

President Zardari at Benazir Bhutto’s mausoleum on December 27

AFP (From Outlook, January 16, 2012)

In this image released by Press Information Department, Pakistan's Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani, right, talks with Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari during their meeting at President House in Islamabad, Pakistan. Gilani claimed there was a conspiracy to oust the country's civilian government, a sign of growing tension with the army over a secret memo sent to Washington earlier this year asking for help in averting a supposed military coup.

AP Photo/Press Information Department, HO

In this image released by Pakistan's Presidential Office, Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zaradi smiles at his residence in Karachi, Pakistan. Pakistan's President has returned home, nearly two weeks after a surprise trip to Dubai for medical treatment sparked rumors that he might step down under pressure from the country's powerful military. Zardari's arrival early will likely help quell speculation about his future.

AP/PTI

Sorit

Sandeep Adhwaryu

From left, Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, Turkish President Abdullah Gul, Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari and Afghan President Hamid Karzai, walk after a meeting in Istanbul, Turkey. Turkey is hosting a conference this week on creating a regional strategy for improving security and economic development in Afghanistan ahead of the withdrawal of international combat forces by the end of 2014.

AP Photo

Afghanistan's President Hamid Karzai, left, Tajikistan's President Emomali Rakhmon, second left, Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, second right, and Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari pose for a picture at a residence outside Dushanbe, Takjik capital. The leaders of the four nations gathered to discuss reconstruction in Afghanistan and the joint fight against drug trafficking and terrorism.

AP/PTI

Sandeep Adhwaryu

President of Afghanistan Hamid Karzai, right, talks with Pakistani counterpart Asif Ali Zardari in Kabul, Afghanistan.

AP Photo/ Omar Sobhani, Pool, Reuters

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, center, and his Pakistani counterpart Asif Ali Zardari, right, arrive for a meeting, at the Iranian presidency office in Tehran, Iran.

AP/PTI

Seated around a table from left to right, Afghan Foreign Minister Zalmay Rasoul, Afghan President Hamid Karzai, Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Salehi, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik, and Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari, attend a round of talks at the Iranian presidency office in Tehran, Iran.

AP/ PTI

Afghan President Hamid Karzai, left, meets Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari in Islamabad, Pakistan. The Afghan president arrived in Pakistan for a visit that is likely to focus in part on the role Islamabad can play in negotiations with the Taliban to end the war in Afghanistan.

AP/ PTI

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets President of Pakistan Asif Ali Zardari in Islamabad, Pakistan. Clinton said that relations between the United States and Pakistan had reached a turning point after the killing of Osama bin Laden and Islamabad must make "decisive steps" in the days ahead to fight terrorism.

AP Photo/ Press Information Department

Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari, right, and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev shake hands during their Kremlin meeting.

AP Photo/ RIA Novosti, Mikhail Klimentyev, Presidential Press Service

Sandeep Adhwaryu

Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari, left, is welcomed by Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan prior to their talks at the latter's official residence in Tokyo.

AP Photo/ Shizuo Kambayashi, Pool

President Barack Obama meets with Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington. Zardari traveled to Washington to attend a memorial service for Ambassador Richard Holbrooke who died in December while serving as Obama's senior envoy to the Afghanistan-Pakistan region.

AP/PTI

US Vice President Joe Biden, left, meets with Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari at the President house in Islamabad. Biden arrived in Pakistan for talks with Pakistani officials on bilateral and security issues.

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

A man points towards the Wikileaks memos shown on a TV screen at an electronic shop in Karachi, Pakistan. Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari sought a pledge from the United Arab Emirates to allow his family long-term refuge, as they did for his late wife, if he died or was killed, according to a secret diplomatic cable released by WikiLeaks.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

Sandeep Adhwaryu

Dark Clouds: If Zardari’s party walks out, Gen Ashfaq Kayani will be the ‘arbiter’

AFP (From Outlook, October 18, 2010)

Sandeep Adhwaryu

Taint Paint: Zardari and Gilani pose with the Pakistan team

AFP (From Outlook, September 13, 2010)

Afghan President Hamid Karzai, left, and Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari shake hands as Russian President Dmitry Medvedev looks on during their meeting in the Bocharov Ruchei residence near Russia's Black Sea resort of Sochi. Medvedev offered Pakistan support in dealing with catastrophic floods as he hosted leaders of Afghan, Pakistan and Tajikistan for talks on efforts to stabilise the region.

AP Photo/RIA-Novosti, Dmitry Astakhov, Presidential Press Service

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron talks with Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari at Chequers, his official country residence. President Zardari has been criticised at home for his diplomatic visit to France and Britain as the worst flooding in Pakistan's history has killed over around 1,500 people and affected four million.

AP Photo/Peter Macdiarmid, pool

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron talks with Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari as they meet at Chequers near Princes Risborough in England.

AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool

Asif Ali Zardari is accompanied by his son Bilawal in striped shirt right and daughter Asifa (left) when they arrived at London's Heathrow Airport.

AP Photo

Asif Ali Zardari the President of Pakistan is accompanied by his son Bilawal (in striped shirt right) and daughter Asifa (left) when they arrived at London's Heathrow Airport.

AP Photo

Asif Ali Zardari is accompanied by his son Bilawal and daughter Asifa when they arrived at London's Heathrow Airport. Zardari is set to meet with British Prime Minister David Cameron. The talks have been overshadowed by Cameron's remarks last week that Pakistan had looked two ways in dealing with terrorists.

AP Photo

Protesters gather outside the Churchill Hyatt Regency Hotel where Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari is staying in London. Zardari is set to meet with British Prime Minister David Cameron. The talks have been overshadowed by Cameron's remarks last week that Pakistan had looked two ways in dealing with terrorists.

AP Photo / Katie Collins, PA

French President Nicolas Sarkozy, right, greets his Pakistani counterpart Asif Ali Zardari prior to their meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris. Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari, facing questions about his country's role in Afghanistan, turns to France for support in talks with French President Nicolas Sarkozy expected to focus on fighting terrorism and sharing intelligence.

AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere

This photo made available by the Press Information Department shows, Indian External Affairs Minister S. M. Krishna, left, meeting Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari in Islamabad. Pakistan and India sought to improve their strained relationship with high-level talks aimed at rebuilding trust that was fractured by the terrorist attacks that killed 166 people in the Indian city of Mumbai nearly two years ago.

AP Photo/Press Information Department

Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari and Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao shake hands during their meeting at Zhongnanhai in Beijing.

AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan, Pool

Asif Ali Zardari

AP

Sandeep Adhwaryu

In the Afghan elections, Pakistan supported Hamid Karzai, “a known devil”

AFP (From Outlook, April 05)

Turkish President Abdullah Gul, right, and his Pakistani counterpart Asif Ali Zardari pose for cameras before a meeting in Istanbul. Turkish, Afghan and Pakistani presidents meet in Istanbul for Turkish-sponsored talks aimed at reducing tensions between Afghanistan and Pakistan.

AP Photo/Ibrahim Usta, Pool

Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi reaches for Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari, during a meeting in Rome's Palazzo Chigi premier's office, Italy.

AP Photo/Andrew Medichini

Iran may be convulsing with violence and seething protests -- as many as Seven Iranian demonstrators were killed on June 15 as per official state media -- but President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is proceeding as if it's business as usual. He arrived in Russia for a summit with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, Chinese President Hu Jintao. Among those present, Manmohan Singh and Asif Ali Zardari

AP Photo/Mikhail Metzel

Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh during a summit of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization in the Ural Mountains city of Yekaterinburg, Russia. The two leaders held a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the summit. It is the first interaction between them since the terrorist attacks in Mumbai last November.

AP Photo/Mikhail Metzel

Country heads participating in a regional summit are, from left: Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, and Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari, as they join hands as they arrive to attend a summit meeting, in Tehran, Iran.

AP Photo/Vahid Salemi

Asif Ali Zardari gained fame pretty fast. Here's another feather in his hat. The Pak President has been listed the fifth biggest loser in the world by the prestigious Foreign Policy magazine. In an article on the 'World's 13 Biggest Losers', a citation reads, "Zardari was known to be a bad guy long before he became Pakistan's President. Many of the closest friends of his late wife Benazir Bhutto could not stand him. Now, as it turns out, neither can most of the Pakistani people."

File Photo/AP

Wednesday October 15, 2008 Mr Zardari went to China, his first bilateral visit as President to any country. Also See: In Taliban's Shadow

AP Photo/ Elizabeth Dalziel

Monday October 6, 2008 Last week, the Pakistan President Asif Zardari  had been in the news for wanting to hug "even more gorgeous" Sarah Palin. This week, what caused a storm in a tea cup was a Wall Street Journal report that quoted him as calling Islamic militants in Kashmir "terrorists". All sorts of people rushed in to condemn him, burning his effigies and calling the militants "freedom fighters". Pakistan information minister Sherry Rehman has now stepped in to "clarify" that  "the president has made it very clear that the just cause of Kashmir and its struggle for self-determination has been a consistent central position of the PPP for 40 years now" and that "there is no change in that policy. He has never called the legitimate aspirations of Kashmiris an expression of terrorism, nor has he undermined the sufferings of the Kashmiri people."  Mr Zardari was also quoted as making a series of conciliatory comments about India. "India has never been a threat to Pakistan," he said and "I, for one, and our democratic government is not scared of Indian influence abroad".

Wednesday September 24, 2008
This meeting, and what he might have thought as his rakish charm, may cost Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari dear. First Pakistan's information minister, Sherry Rehman, decided to flatter Sarah Palin, the US vice-presidential candidate: “And how does one keep looking that good when one is that busy?” Rehman asked rhetorically. “Oh, thank you,” Palin said. Not to be outdone, Zardari, the widowed husband of the assassinated Benazir Bhutto, called Palin “even more gorgeous” than he thought, and then remarked: “Now I know why the whole of America is crazy about you.” “You are so nice,” Palin replied, smiling. “Thank you.” That was not all. When Zardari’s aide told the two politicians to keep shaking hands for the cameras, Zardari remarked: “If he’s insisting, I might hug.” For the record, no hug took place but Maulana Abdul Ghafar, the prayer leader of Islamabad's Lal Masjid, has taken umbrage and said the act was un-Islamic and unbecoming of a head of state of a Muslim country.  The Maulana also said that Zardari shamed the entire Pakistani by publicly making indecent gestures towards Palin in Washington. Clearly, while the Alaska governor was making even the most rabid Republicans cringe with her incoherent responses in various TV appearances, the new Pakistani Prez had at least come up with a way to make people sympathise with her.

AP Photo/Henny Ray Abrams

Monday September 9, 2008
Wonders -- or disasters -- never cease in Pakistan. With Musharraf gone, it is the turn of Mr 10 Percent Asif Ali Zardari to be the President. And within a couple of hours of being sworn in, he held a joint news conference with Afghan President Hamid Karzai to say that he had a "comprehensive plan" to fight the war on terror. No body is holding their breath. Also See: A Pliant President

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

Tuesday May 13, 2008
Earthquake in China was followed by a political upheaval in Pakistan as nine PML-N ministers resigned from the barely six-week-old PPP-led coalition government over the issue of restoration of judges. But both parties have kept open the path to reconciliation. The PML-N pulled out of the ruling coalition on May 12 after the expiry of the second deadline set for reinstating dozens of judges sacked by President Pervez Musharraf. PML-N chief Nawaz Sharif assured PM Gilani that his party would continue to support the government while Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani refused to accept the resignations tendered to him by the ministers.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

Monday March 17, 2008
And finally, Pakistan inaugurated a new parliament on March 17 which seems all set to get its first woman Speaker. The Pakistan People's Party on March 18 nominated 51-year-old Fahmida Mirza and Faisal Karim Kundi as its candidates for the posts of Speaker and Deputy Speaker respectively of the lower house of parliament. Meanwhile, it seems increasingly clear that whoever is chosen as the PM would only be for an interim period as Asif Ali Zardari's camp has made it known that with all corruption charges against him dropped, the path has been cleared for him to stand for elections, win and appoint himself PM in a matter of months. The photo shows him with former prime minister Nawaz Sharif during the National assembly's first session at Parliament House in Islamabad on March 17, 2008.

AP Photo/Pakistan Parliament House¤ HO

Asif Ali Zardari, center, widower of Pakistan's assassinated opposition leader Benazir Bhutto joins hands with former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, left, and Asfandyar Wali Khan during meeting of politicians in Islamabad, Pakistan on Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008. There had been rumours of a possible deal between Zardari and Musharraf which gained wider currency after Pakistan government closed all corruption cases against the former. With Musharraf's fate hanging in balance, the graft cases were "terminated" shortly after the Supreme Court dismissed three petitions challenging Musharraf's controversial National Reconciliation Ordinance (NRO) promulgated last October. PPP leaders--late Benazir Bhutto and her husband Asif Ali Zardari, now the co-chairman of the single largest party, had got amnesty for the corruption cases dating back to the 1980s and 1990s following Musharraf's order. The cases were terminated by the National Accountability Bureau(NAB).

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

Democracy takes revenge. This brief headline in a Pakistani newspaper summed up the result of the general election in which the opposition PPP and PML-N emerged as key players, while Musharraf-backed PML-Q was routed. While the poll results are a clear mandate against Musharraf, it is also a mandate for two parties -- the PPP and the PML-N -- that have been arch rivals for more than two decades to form a coalition government as the two together form sixty per cent of the seats in the Pakistani national assembly. US has termed these elections as "largely fair". Musharraf meanwhile seems no have no plans of quitting and has asserted that he intends to stay in office to 'guide the democratic transition in the country'. While there had earlier been speculation about the PPP and the PML-N coming together to impeach Musharraf (for which a 75% majority in national assembly is required), the talk on the street has shifted to a possible deal between Asif Zardari and Musharraf. In this photo released by Pakistan People's Party, Asif Ali Zardari, left, husband of Pakistan's slain opposition leader Benazir Bhutto walks with former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif after their meeting at Sharif's residence in Raiwind near Lahore, Pakistan. Also See: When Push Comes To Mush

AP Photo/Pakistan People¿s Party/HO

Dynasty politics, take a bow. The Zardari-Bhutto kids, Asif Ali Zardari claimed, had added Bhutto to their names. Benazir's niece Fatima Bhutto hinted that Benazir's will, brought out to the world by Asif Ali Zardari, was fake, and that by merely adding "Bhutto" to his name, Bilawal does not become the real Bhutto Pakistanis need. The immediate installation of Bilawal Bhutto Zardari, as the "symbolic" chief of PPP, following Benazir Bhutto's assassination meant, among other things, that the UK government would have to provide him special security by Scotland Yard, costing around £1 million, at Oxford University, where he is currently studying.

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