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Ajmal Amir Kasab

The mercy petition filed by 26/11 Mumbai attacks' hanged convict Ajmal Kasab before the President. The petition is now made public under the RTI Act.

PTI Photo

People look at a poster of Mohammed Ajmal Kasab with a noose around his neck, at the Chhatrapati Shivaji train station, one of the sites of the terror attack in Mumbai, on its fourth anniversary. Kasab, the lone surviving gunman was executed on Nov. 22, from the 2008 Mumbai attack, four years after Pakistani gunmen blazed through India's financial capital, killing 166 people and shattering relations between the nuclear-armed neighbors.

AP Photo/ Rafiq Maqbool

Carnage at CST Kasab ran riot here on 26/11

AFP (From Outlook 03 December 2012)

At home Villagers in Kasab’s village learn of his hanging

AFP (From Outlook 03 December 2012)

Pandora’s box With Kasab hanged, the clamour for Parliament attack accused Afzal Guru goes up, especially from right-wing groups

Sanjay Rawat

Effigy of Ajmal Kasab during the celebration of his execution at CST station in Mumbai

Amit Haralkar

BJP activists dance as they celebrate the news of Mohammed Ajmal Kasab's execution, in Mumbai.

AP Photo/ Rafiq Maqbool

Members of Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad celebrate the news of Mohammed Ajmal Kasab's execution, in Guwahati.

AP Photo/ Anupam Nath

Karuna, wife of a victim of the 2008 Mumbai attacks Thakur Budha Vaghela, breaks down as she watches with her son Neeraj the news of Mohammed Ajmal Kasab's execution, in Mumbai.

AP Photo/ Rajanish Kakade

BJP activists prepare to light a poster of Mohammed Ajmal Kasab as they celebrate his execution, in Mumbai.

AP Photo/ Rafiq Maqbool

BJP members celebrating the hanging of Kasab, the lone surviving terrorist of 2008 Mumbai terror attack, in Pune.

PTI Photo

Women exchange sweets as they celebrate the hanging of Ajmal Kasab, the lone surviving terrorist in Mumbai attacks, in front of the statue of constable Tukaram Omble who caught Kasab, in Mumbai.

PTI Photo

An activist of Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad pours kerosene to burn an effigy of Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, the lone surviving gunman from the 2008 terror attacks on Mumbai, to celebrate his execution, in Bangalore.

AP Photo/ Aijaz Rahi

A man feeds pigeons outside the Taj Mahal hotel, one of the targets of the 2008 terror attacks in Mumbai.

AP Photo/ Rafiq Maqbool

BJP activists light crackers to celebrate upon hearing the news of India executing Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, the lone surviving gunman from the 2008 terror attacks, in Hyderabad.

AP Photo/ Mahesh Kumar A.

People jubilate outside Yerawada prison, where the lone surviving terrorist of 2008 Mumbai terror attacks Ajmal Amir Kasab was hanged to death in Pune.

PTI Photo

BJP activists distribute sweets to celebrate the news of India executing Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, the lone surviving gunman from the 2008 terror attacks, in Jammu.

AP Photo/ Channi Anand

BJP activists light firecrackers to celebrate the news of Mohammed Ajmal Kasab's execution, in Jammu.

AP Photo/ Channi Anand

Activists of Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad offer sweets to a policeman to celebrate on hearing the news that Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, the lone surviving gunman from the 2008 terror attacks on Mumbai, was executed, in Bangalore.

AP Photo/ Aijaz Rahi

An activist of Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad, prepares an effigy of Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, the lone surviving gunman from the 2008 terror attacks on Mumbai, before it was burned to celebrate his execution in Bangalore.

AP Photo/ Aijaz Rahi

Bajrang Dal activists celebrate the hanging of Ajmal Amir Kasab, the sole surviving Pakistani gunman involved in the Mumbai attacks, by distributing sweets and lighting crackers at Chikmagalur in Karnataka.

PTI Photo

Policemen stand outside the Yerwada Jail where Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, the lone surviving gunman from the 2008 terror attacks, was hung at 7.30 am in secrecy in Pune. Kasab, a Pakistani citizen, was one of 10 gunmen who rampaged through the streets of Mumbai for three days in November 2008, killing 166 people.

AP Photo

People celebrate upon hearing the news of execution of Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, the lone surviving gunman from the 2008 terror attacks in Mumbai. Kasab was hung in secrecy at 7:30 a.m. at Pune's Yerwada jail after President Pranab Mukherjee rejected his plea for mercy.

AP Photo/Ajit Solanki

People celebrate upon hearing the news of execution of Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, the lone surviving gunman from the 2008 terror attacks on Mumbai. Kasab, a Pakistani citizen, was one of 10 gunmen who rampaged through the streets of Mumbai for three days in November 2008, killing 166 people.

AP Photo/Ajit Solanki

Policemen stand outside the Yerwada Jail where Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, the lone surviving gunman from the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks, was hung at 7.30 am in secrecy in Pune.

AP Photo

People celebrate upon hearing the news of execution of Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, the lone surviving gunman from the 2008 terror attacks in Mumbai. Kasab, a Pakistani citizen, was one of 10 gunmen who rampaged through the streets of Mumbai for three days in November 2008, killing 166 people. Kasab was hung in secrecy at 7:30 a.m. at at Pune's Yerwada jail after President Pranab Mukherjee rejected his plea for mercy.

AP Photo/Ajit Solanki

Ajmal Kasab, the lone surviving 26/11 terrorist, was hanged at 7.30 AM at Yervada Jail in Pune, Maharashtra home minister R.R. Patil said. Kasab's mercy plea was rejected by the President Pranab Mukherjee on November 8.

The DEATH SENTENCE for 26/11 accused AJMAL KASAB, by the Supreme Court. The lone survivor from the Mumbai attacks becomes death row prisoner No. 309.

Activists of Shiva Sena hold party flags amid fire crackers as they celebrate after Supreme Court upheld the death sentence of Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, the only surviving gunman of the deadly 2008 Mumbai attacks in Mumbai.

AP Photo/ Rafiq Maqbool

Activists of Shiva Sena shout slogans as they celebrate after Supreme Court upheld the death sentence of Mohammed Ajmal Kasab Kasab, the only surviving gunman of the deadly 2008 Mumbai attacks in Mumbai.

AP Photo/ Rafiq Maqbool

Prosecution lawyer Gopal Subramaniam, left, along with senior advocate Raju Ramachandran, right, who had been appointed amicus curiae by the Supreme Court to defend Mohammed Ajmal Kasab address the media outside the Supreme Court in New Delhi.

AP Photo/ Manish Swarup

Combo File -- A picture of Pakistani terrorist Ajmal Amir Kasab (L) who is sentenced to death for 26/11 terror attack case and Sayed Zabiuddin alias Abu Jundal, one of the handlers in 26/11 Mumbai attacks. Kasab was confronted with Jundal at Arthur Road Jail in Mumbai where Kasab identified the latter as "one of the main conspirators" of the attack.

PTI Photo

Mar. 16, 2009. Three of the four -- other than the US -- editions.

Time magazine, Time.com

Members of the All India Anti Terrorist Front shout slogans demanding hanging of Kasab, Afzal and Bhullar, in Gurgaon.

PTI Photo

Sandeep Adhwaryu

Residents celebrate after Bombay High court's verdict upholding the death sentence of 26/11 convict Ajmal Amir Kasab, urging the government to hang him for the crime, in Mordabad.

PTI Photo

People burn Ajmal Amir Kasab's photograph after his death sentence was upheld by the Bombay High Court, in Ahmedabad.

PTI PHOTO

People celebrate with sweets after the Bombay High Court upheld the death sentence to 26/11 terror attack convict Ajmal Amir Kasab, in Mumbai.

PTI Photo/ Santosh Hirlekar

Government prosecutor Ujjwal Nikam, center, shows victory sign as he leaves the trial court in Mumbai. The court confirmed the conviction and death sentence for Pakistan's Ajmal Kasab, 22, the only surviving gunman from the 2008 attacks on Mumbai, which killed 166 people.

AP Photo/ Rafiq Maqbool

File photo of Ajmal Kasab from the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminal video footage during 26/11. The Bombay High Court upheld the death sentence to Pakistani terrorist Ajmal Amir Kasab for his involvement in the 26/11 Mumbai terror attacks that left 166 people dead.

AP Photo/ PTI Photo

Public prosecutor Ujjwal Nikam speaks with the members of the media after the hearing of the Ajmal Amir Kasab, the only gunman to survive the 26/11 terror attacks in Mumbai. The Bombay High Court will deliver its judgment on Kasabfs death sentence on Feb. 21.

AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool

26/11 terrorist Ajmal Amir Kasab's lawyer Amin Solkar coming out of the Bombay High Court in Mumbai.

PTI Photo/ Santosh Hirlekar

A Muslim woman signs a banner demanding the execution of convicted terrorist Ajmal Kasab, at Chhatrapati Shivaji train station in Mumbai. India marked the second anniversary of the Mumbai terror attack with somber ceremonies and a renewed promise to seek justice for the 166 people slain in an assault that has set back peace efforts with arch rival Pakistan. Kasab, the only gunman to survive the assault, has been sentenced to death, but none of the seven alleged masterminds arrested in Pakistan has been put on trial.

AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade

sandeep adhwaryu

The Bombay High Court appointed Advocate Amin Solkar for accuse Ajmal Amir Kasab, arrives at High Court, in Mumbai. Kasab today smiled, yawned and scratched his head showing no signs of remorse as the State opened arguments in the Bombay High Court on confirmation of his death sentence.

AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool

Sandeep Adhwaryu

A group of Muslims celebrate Kasab’s death sentence after their own fashion in Mumbai

PTI

A young boy celebrate Kasab’s death sentence after their own fashion in Mumbai

AFP (From Outlook, May 24)

Voice against terror NIJAAT activists express support for the sentence of Ajmal Kasab

Dinesh Parab

Special Public Prosecutor Ujjwal Nikam gestures while interacting with the media after a special court pronounced death sentence to Ajmal Kasab in 26/11 terror attacks, in Mumbai.

PTI Photo/Shirish Shete

Pakistani gunman Ajmal Amir Kasab was today sentenced to death by a special court for the Mumbai terror attacks, three days after he was pronounced guilty of mass murder and waging war against the Indian state. Kasab was given death penalty on five counts including waging war against the nation, murder, criminal conspiracy and committing terror activities.

AP Photo/PTI Photo

Shiv Sena activist burning an effigy of Ajmal Kasab, convicted in 26/11 Mumbai attack cases, demanding death sentence for him in Amritsar. Kasab, convicted for the 26/11 terror attacks, will be sentenced on May 6th, Thursday by a special court with the prosecution demanding death penalty, branding him a killing machine manufactured in Pakistan.

PTI Phot

Special Public Prosecutor Ujjwal Nikam gestures as he comes out of the special court at Arthur Road Jail after pronouncement of verdict in 26/11 terror attack cases, in Mumbai. The 26/11 court today fixed May 6 for sentencing Ajmal Kasab in the Mumbai attacks case after the prosecution pitched for death penalty for the Pakistani terrorist and the defence pleaded for leniency given his young age.

PTI Photo/Santosh Hirlekar

Special Public Prosecutor Ujjwal Nikam, arrives to the special court set up for the trial of Pakistani Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, convicted in the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks, in Mumbai. The prosecution today sought death penalty for Pakistani gunman Ajmal Amir Kasab, convicted for 26/11 terror attacks, describing him as a killing machine manufactured in Pakistan who has total disregard for life.

(AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool

Mumbaikers celebrate with fire crackers at CST station in Mumbai after a special court held Pak terrorist Ajmal Kasab guilty in 26/11 terror attack case.

PTI Photo

26/11 TERROR ATTACK CASE.

PTI GRAPHICS

Special Public Prosecutor Ujjwal Nikam shows a file as he comes out of the special court at Arthur Road Jail after pronouncement of verdict in 26/11 terror attack case, in Mumbai. The court held Pakistani terrorist Ajmal Amir Kasab guilty in the case.

PTI Photo/Santosh Hirlekar

Home Minister P Chidambaram makes a statement over verdict in 26/11 case at Parliament House in New Delhi. Chidambaram said that the conviction of Ajmal Kasab and acquittal of two local accomplices in Mumbai attack case shows India is governed by rule of law but sends a message to Pakistan that it should not export terror.

PTI Photo/Subhav Shukla

Media wait outside the special court set up for the trial of a Pakistani accused of being the sole surviving gunman in the 2008 terror attacks, in Mumbai.

AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade

Special Public Prosecutor Ujjwal Nikam gestures as he arrives at the the special court set up for the trial of a Pakistani accused of being the sole surviving gunman in the 2008 terror attacks in Mumbai.

AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool

Members of Fight Against Terrorism shouting slogans during a protest demanding hanging of terrorist Kasab, in Ahmedabad. Elaborate security arrangements have been made in and around the Arthur Road Central jail where a special court would today decide the fate of Pakistani gunman Mohammed Ajmal Amir Kasab and two Indians for their alleged role in the 26/11 terror attacks.

PTI Photo

An armed security officer patrols outside the special court set up for the trial of Ajmal Kasab, the sole surviving gunman in the 2008 terror attacks, in Mumbai.

AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade

Ajmal Kasab from the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminal video footage during 26/11

AP

Ghajini Short-Term Memory Loss Certificate to Ajmal Kasab, for thinking he was firing his way through CST for a Bollywood audition.

Caricatures by Sandeep Adhwaryu

The special 26/11 trial court today sacked Abbas Kazmi, the defence counsel for Pakistani gunman Ajmal Kasab for "non-cooperation", three days after it showed leniency and allowed him to continue accepting an unconditional apology for his controversial utterances.

PTI Photo/Shashank Parade

An effigy of Pakistani Ajmal Amir Kasab, the lone surviving terrorist from the 26/11 attacks in Mumbai is seen during Dussehra celebrations in Indore.

AP Photo

A special court today adjourned the proceedings in the 26/11 trial till tomorrow after the prosecution sought time to file its reply on the confession of the lone surviving terrorist Mohammad Ajmal Kasab.

File Photo

The lone surviving terrorist in 26/11 Mumbai terror strikes, Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, stunned the court, his defence lawyers and everyone present by pleading guilty to the attacks that left over 180 dead and over 100 injured.

File Photo/Courtesy NDTV

Public prosecutor Ujjwal Nikam, with photo journalist Sebastian D'Souza (L), who identified Pakistani Gunman Kasab before a special court and provided photographs as evidence, interacts with the media in Mumbai. The evidence of this witness is considered significant because he is not only an eyewitness but also is the first witness to provide documentary evidence of the terror attack.

PTI Photo

"Yeh sab galat hai, mujhe kabool nahin hai", said Kasab as he pleaded not guilty, adding that he wanted to face the trial. The charges framed against Kasab include waging war against nation, murder, attempt to murder, conspiracy, damaging railway property, entering India without valid passport, carrying arms and RDX, planting bombs and firing at various places in Mumbai. In the photo: Kasab's lawyer, Abbas Kazmi speaks to the media outside the Arthur Road Jail.

AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade

Paramilitary soldiers patrol past a man offering prayers in the Arthur Road Jail, in Mumbai, where Mohammed Ajmal Kasab is held. The trial in the November 26 Mumbai terror attack case began today.

AP Photo/Gautam Singh

Abbas Kazmi, the newly-appointed lawyer for Ajmal Amir Kasab, comes out of the Arthur Road Jail where a special bombproof courtroom has been set up in Mumbai. Kasab had requested for a Pakistani lawyer after the judge yesterday removed Anjali Waghmare as his counsel on a complaint of professional misconduct. Special public prosecutor Ujwal Nikam informed the court that Kasab's request had been forwarded to the joint secretary of the Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) through a fax message. However, there has been no response from the Pakistan side so far.

AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade

Anjali Waghmare the state-appointed lawyer for the Pakistani gunman charged in last year's Mumbai terror attacks, leaves the premises of the Arthur Road Jail where a special bombproof courtroom has been set up in Mumbai. Anjali was barred from representing Kasab because of a conflict of interest, a special judge said moments before the trial was to begin.

AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade

Advocate Anjali Waghmare speaking to the media outside a court in Mumbai. Waghmare has agreed to defend 26/11 terrorist Ajmal Amir Kasab after being assured Z-category security by the government.

PTI Photo/Shashank Parade

A fisherman rests on his boat at a coast in Porbandar, 412 kilometers west of Ahmedabad. Security has been beefed up in coastal towns and ports in Gujarat as the terrorists are suspected to have used the Porbandar port to reach Mumbai. The Indian navy is investigating whether a trawler found drifting off the coast of Mumbai, with a bound corpse on board, was used to ferry the militants.

Burnt-out interior on the top floors of the Taj Mahal Hotel. Picture released by Mumbai Fire Brigade.

This is an undated image of Ajmal Amir Iman, the terrorist who was captured alive in the recent Mumbai attacks. Picture released by Mumbai State police department.

Mumbai is back on its feet. People wait on the platforms of the landmark Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus train station, one of the several places where the attackers shot at people.

True to Mumbai's 'Never Say Die' spirit a man hoists a flag opposite Taj hotel.

Leopold Cafe opened up with a placard saying 'Come to Leo with hugs and smiles'.

Sunday, November 30, 2008
A devastated Nariman House after the army operation was over.

Italian chef Emanuele Lattanzi and his daughter walk out after being rescued from Oberoi Trident Hotel.

Moshe Holtzberg, the 2-year-old orphan of the rabbi and his wife murdered in the Jewish center Chabad-Lubavitch (Nariman House), cries during a memorial service at a synagogue in Mumbai. Moshe turned two years old the same day his parents were brutally murdered.

Grief stricken husband Shantanu, son Anirudha and daughter Arundhati during the cremation of Times of India journalist Sabina Sehgal Saikia, who was killed in the terrorist attack at the Taj Hotel.

Firemen dousing the last of the flames at Taj

Indian Hotels Co. Ltd that owns the Taj chain of hotels is part of the Tata group. The chairman of Tata Sons Ltd and head of the Tata group, Ratan Tata, looks on as smoke billows out after the operation to flush out terrorists finally got over more than 62 hours after terrorists had entered the Taj hotel.

Taj hotel engulfed in smoke.

The Bravehearts
His uniform is placed on his body as Hemant Karkare, the chief of Mumbai's Anti-Terrorist Squad is taken for cremation.

Senior BJP leader LK Advani visits CST station

Army soldiers take positions near the Oberoi hotel

Friday, November 28, 2008
National Security Guard commandos descend a rope to reach the top of Nariman House.

Bereaved mother Dhanalakshmi touches the forehead of her son Sandeep Unnikrishnan, a National Security Guards officer, who died fighting gunmen inside the Taj Mahal hotel.

Senior police officers salute, as wife Kavita Karkare looks on during the funeral.

NSG Commandos surrounding Nariman House where suspected militants were holed up.

9.15 pm, Wednesday, November 26, 2008
Firing was first reported from Leopold restaurant in Colaba, Mumbai. And this time, terror had a face. There were five young terrorists between 20-25, armed with AK-47s and grenades. They began shooting indiscriminately. Police later claimed these five were out of a group of 12 terrorists that entered Mumbai from Gujarat on one of the many Gujarat Fisheries boats that come into Sasoon Dock. The police said they used an inflatable raft from Sasoon Dock to enter Mumbai shores via Gateway of India. That is where they got off and dispersed in different directions. Initial reports put the firing as gang-war. Eyewitnesses said some of them spoke Arabic, and they included Nigerian or Somali mercenaries.

Finally, the lone surviving terrorist was owned up by his parents in Pakistan. "I was in denial for the first couple of days, now I have accepted it. This is the truth. This is my son Ajmal," Amir Kasab was quoted as having told Dawn of Pakistan in his first interview to the media since his son's arrest. But the government of Pakistan continued to be in denial mode. It said that they had not yet requested consular access to Ajmal as India had not provided any evidence on his identity and nationality. "Our own investigations cannot proceed beyond a certain point without provision of credible information and evidence pertaining to Mumbai attacks", Pakistani Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi maintained with a straight face.