#QuarantineReads: Travel For Pride

#QuarantineReads: Travel For Pride
Plan your next getaway with these LGBTQ+ books, Photo Credit: Shutterstock

Queer romance to travel accounts, these books will not only transport you—they might even make you shed a tear or two

Roshni Subramanian
April 18 , 2020
07 Min Read

Be it a ‘coming-of-age’ fictional account or an autobiographical travel memoir, literary works that come under the LGBTQ+ umbrella are increasingly gaining mainstream recognition. While some are thought provoking, others are pure tear jerkers that will have you weeping well before the climax. Here’s our list of LGBTQ+ travel books that will give you a glimpse into the world of queer travel and some serious #travelgoals.

Venice

 
 
 
View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Joseph Gerhard (@joe.gerhard) on May 20, 2019 at 4:05am PDT

There’s a reason why Jan Morris’s Venice is often hailed as one of the best travel books ever written. Offering a peek into the Venetian life, the narrative is set against the backdrop of the city’s history. A romantic and deeply personal account revolving around her affair with the city, Morris’s Venice is dotted with her astringent humour. Jan Morris first visited Venice as James Morrison and paints a composite portrait of the city highlighting its streets, architecture, curiosities and vibe. An intimate yet expansive read, Venice is mandatory reading for your next Venetian visit.

Call Me By Your Name

 
 
 
View this post on Instagram

A post shared by m i š k a ðŸÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂŒÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂŒ (@miskabooks) on Mar 20, 2020 at 4:32am PDT

Set in Northern Italy, Andre Aciman’s Call Me By Your Name recounts the summer fling between 16-year-old Elio and the 24-year-old graduate student Oliver. A lush story of first love and desire, the stunning portrayal of towns like Cremona, Crema, Bergamo and Sirmione (in the movie version) is almost too good to be true. With the languid lakes, the fields, the cobblestoned streets, Andre Aciman’s coming-of-age drama is firmly positioned in Lombardy. The book will not only leave you with a lump in your throat and a tightness in your chest but also with a strong desire to hit the road to see the sites yourself. 

Gay Travels in the Muslim World

A collection of 17 short personal accounts, Gay Travels in the Muslim World by Michael T. Muongo documents the experiences of gay men in the United States, Europe and the Middle East. Starting from Mauritiana to Oman, Sylhet and even covering Afghanistan, each account is a unique window into this deeply closeted world. Touching upon politics and the geopolitical scenario post 9/11, what is at the core of the book is the issue of gender identity and the massive differences between East and West. 

The Songlines

 
 
 
View this post on Instagram

A post shared by @one_book_a_day on Jan 30, 2020 at 3:18pm PST

Set in Central Australia, Bruce Chatwin's The Songlines is revolutionary for more than one reason. A classic travelogue revolving around the journey to the heart of Australia, Chatwin elaborates on his need to travel and the origins of his 'wanderlust'. Delving into Aboriginal culture, he states that it is one of the best-preserved nomadic cultures still in existence. Starting his journey from Alice Springs, the author introduces the readers to his companion Arkady Volchok. Offering tiny anecdotes and quotations, and facts, Chatwin's Songlines engages the full range of his passions. 

On the Road

 
 
 
View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Jack Kerouac Quotes (@jackkerouacquotes) on Apr 16, 2020 at 9:09am PDT

In pursuit of freedom and authenticity, Jack Kerouac sets out on a journey across North America resulting in a novel that has inspired an entire generation. Set in that backdrop of 1950s underground America, On The Road chronicles Kerouac's love for America and jazz and encapsulates the era of sex and drugs. As Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty, Kerouac and his travel companion traverse the length and breadth of America. The book not only celebrates the abundance, vitality and the spirit of American youth, it is also a quest for self-knowledge.


Related Articles

These Countries will Pay...

Malvika Dangwal October 21 , 2020

A Chat with the Indian...

Prannay Pathak September 07 , 2020

How are Countries Trying...

Aroshi Handu August 15 , 2020

Here to there

Explore Directions(Routes) and more...
to Go

Our Other Editions

Outlook’ is India’s most vibrant weekly news magazine with critically and globally acclaimed print and digital editions. Now in its 23rd year...

Explore All
  • Check out our Magazine of the month
  • Offbeat destinations
  • In-depth storytelling
  • Stunning pictures
  • Subscribe