Advertisement
Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021
Outlook.com

The Axis Year

When India was closest to being a non-functioning anarchy

The Axis Year
(Image copyright The Singh Twins; www.singhtwins.co.uk)
The Axis Year
outlookindia.com
-0001-11-30T00:00:00+05:53

In the aftermath of the Second World War, a writer born in the Bihar town of Motihari published a dystopian novel predicting the victory of totalitarianism in the West. This envisaged an all-powerful state that would take over all aspects of a citizen’s life, regulating what he (or she) could—and could not—think, eat, speak, etc. The book’s title simply inverted the last two numbers of the year in which it was written.

When 1984 finally did arrive, it was not an especially bad year for the countries that George Orwell had in mind. The economy of his own homeland, England, was on the mend, while victory in the Falklands War had given rise to a renewed sense of national pride. As for the two superpowers, the United States was not, in 1984, involved in a major war, this a rather exceptional occurrence in its conflict-ridden history. Meanwhile, with the death of the ogre Leonid Brezhnev, the USSR had finally begun to allow its citizens to breathe. The stage was being set for the ascendancy of Mikhail Gorbachev and his...

Advertisement

Outlook Newsletters

Advertisement

Read More from Outlook

Hathras Gang Rape:   A Year To The Ground

Hathras Gang Rape: A Year To The Ground

Second of Outlook’s six-part series that captures the horror and heartbreak at Hathras village in Uttar Pradesh a year ago.

India To Resume Export Of Surplus Vaccines Next Month

India To Resume Export Of Surplus Vaccines Next Month

Health Minister Mansukh Mandaviya said the government will receive over 30 crore doses of COVID-19 vaccines in October and over 100 crore doses in the next three months.

IPL 2021: Clinical KKR Outplay RCB

IPL 2021: Clinical KKR Outplay RCB

The result will not just boost their morale immensely but also improve KKR's net run rate going ahead.

Amazon Claims It Has 'Zero Tolerance' For Corruption

Amazon Claims It Has 'Zero Tolerance' For Corruption

The e-commerce retailer was responding to a report alleging a certain amount paid by Amazon in legal fees have been used to pay bribes by one or more of its legal representatives.

Advertisement