Poshan
Letters | Jan 22, 2001
  • Bleeding Doves
    Jan 22, 2001

    The Indian government’s offer of a ceasefire was made solely to please the international community (Combatants for Peace, January 8). It was meant to bring peace, yet innocent people are still being killed in the Valley.
    Govinda Keshavdas,
    Chennai

    At least now pseudo-secularists like you, the Congress, Mulla Mulayam’s SP, and the Left parties can appreciate the fact that "scratch a Muslim" and you’ll find a medieval religious fundamentalist underneath. Syed Ali Shah Geelani has proved Hindu leaders right.
    L.Y. Rao,
    on e-mail

    Vajpayee is continuing his Lahore fantasy. He has tied up our armed forces by declaring a ceasefire, even though they continue to be singled out for terrorist attacks. This is no ceasefire, it’s unilateral surrender.
    Damodar N. Phadnis,
    Mumbai

  • King of His Castle
    Jan 22, 2001

    Congratulations, Vishwanathan Anand. We are proud of you. And we hope the government awards you the highest sports honour anon.
    S.A. Ramakrishnan,
    Galway, Ireland

  • Call to Unfaith
    Jan 22, 2001

    In his statement in Parliament, A.B. Vajpayee called the December 6, 1992, incident at Ayodhya a nationwide movement (The PM’s Afternoon Raga, December 25). In effect, it amounts to a call for Muslims to come together, to protect themselves, their rights and their places of worship from uncivilised fundamentalists who do not know how to respect another’s religion or right.
    Mohd. W. Islam Dudul,
    Hojai, Assam

    Are you going to play into the hands of the government and the Sangh parivar and continue carrying stories on Ayodhya and Bofors in the run-up to the UP assembly elections and probably a mid-term Lok Sabha poll, and then forget all about it? Where are the follow-ups on Veerappan or are you waiting for him to kidnap Amitabh or Hrithik? I think it’s your fault the public has a short memory.
    Rajeev Matta,
    on e-mail

  • Part-Time Humanists
    Jan 22, 2001

    Apropos Khushwant Singh’s review (Mosque Breakers, December 25) of A.G. Noorani’s book, there’s a lament against secularism being enfeebled because a structure was demolished. I want to ask if these ‘secularists’ feel similarly aggrieved when Hindus are massacred in the name of jehad and made refugees in their own country.
    Aruna M.,
    on e-mail

  • The Corporation Game
    Jan 22, 2001

    Your cover story on Shahrukh Khan (Raju Ban Gaya Gentleman, December 25) was nothing but a PR stunt. How much were you paid to publish it?
    Abhishek Verma,
    Delhi

  • Faulty Pitch
    Jan 22, 2001

    The article Caught at Sillypoint (December 25) could do with being referred to the third umpire. There are problems with some of the ‘facts’ Wadekar has told the cbi and which you have reported. First of all, Gary Kirsten had not even made his debut when India toured South Africa in 1992-93. In fact, Kapil Dev had run out Peter Kirsten, Gary’s half-brother, in one of the limited-over internationals after having warned him once or twice during the Test series. Nor was Kapil’s contribution with the bat and ball in that series as bad as you have made it out to be.
    N. Soorya Prakash,
    Chennai

  • Big Guns in Bollywood
    Jan 22, 2001

    So Bharat Shah’s contention that he is not concerned about his producer’s background turns out to be false (Scenes of the Mafia, December 25). The mafiaisation of Bollywood is an undeniable fact. The temptation of fast dates from artistes, quick release of films and easy money catalyse an unholy alliance between the mafia and producers like Rizvi. If film-making has been conferred the status of an industry, why can’t these entrepreneurs and their ventures be subject to scrutiny?
    Pramod Srivastava,
    Ghaziabad

  • Blunt Counter
    Jan 22, 2001

    Brooke Unger, in his endeavour to blunt Arundhati’s pen (The Errors of Arundhati, December 18), fails to convincingly counter the issues that she raises. The figures that he cites in favour of growth in the Chinese economy disguise the fact that the living standard of the Chinese has come down considerably during the late ’90s after the inflow of foreign direct investment into the country. And he alone knows how the division of Europe between the blocs ended in a "vindication of capitalism".
    Praveen Kumar,
    Darbhanga, Bihar

  • Jan 22, 2001

    In the cover story The Badge of Renaissance (January 15), we mention General S. Padmanabhan has plans to reduce the training period in the ima. This is incorrect. In fact, the army chief has reinstated the original training period.

  • Fast Train to the Nowhere Junctions
    Jan 22, 2001

    Once again Narayan’s Malgudi (and ours too) breathed new life, courtesy Manu Joseph’s visit there (Sleepless in Swamitown). Malgudi is very much a part of the Indian consciousness, even if there’s a question mark against it on the map.
    Satyam Ranjeet,
    on e-mail

    Bored by the usual IT success stories, eating-out trends and the upward mobility of urban India, your New Year special was refreshing. The detours brought back a flurry of memories and anecdotes about an India that’s hardly talked about. It also exposed the poor sense of history we Indians have. I wonder how many of our Net-surfing generation would know of Mughalsarai or Udupi. The piece on Malgudi too was excellent. The issue was truly an ode to the kind of journalism that’s on the wane these days.
    Savitha G.R.,
    Bangalore

  • Fast Train to the Nowhere Junctions
    Jan 22, 2001

    Your New Year double issue (January 8) was a sheer delight. The Detours were really a tour de force. Each of the pieces was beautifully seasoned with nostalgia. Within two hours, I knew more about my vibrant country than in the last 22 years. You more than amply proved that India’s culture lives and breathes in the bylanes of the country. Thanks for rediscovering India for me.
    Gurdas Singh Sandhu,
    Ludhiana

  • Fast Train to the Nowhere Junctions
    Jan 22, 2001

    Your detour to Jhoomritelaiya (Radio Latitude) filled me with a sense of pride. It’s amazing that the people of a place—which has nothing to boast of compared to its glorious past and where current socio-economic conditions are not the best—have managed to retain their jovial nature (perhaps the word ‘jhoom’ has something to do with it). Sandipan Deb has captured the beauty of that spirit and told the world it’s indeed a Jhoomritelaiya and no Gloomytelaiya.
    Manish Daruka,
    on e-mail

  • Fast Train to the Nowhere Junctions
    Jan 22, 2001

    An absolute delight! Reality Checks did wind up the year in style; Winners and Whiners made an interesting read while From Udupi to Naxalbari via Jhoomritelaiya took us on a roller-coaster ride. Even Jay’s World was stimulating.
    Srinath H.R.,
    Bangalore

    Your article on Udupi was as crisp as the udupi dosa it talks about (Food, Holy Food!). But the writer seems to have got a bit carried away by Udupi’s temples, its culture and traditions. He talks at length about Car Street (temple area) and the eating joints. What he’s forgotten, or is unaware of, is Yakshagana or the folk art of the region which is an inseparable part of its tradition.
    Shobha Udupa,
    Udupi

    It was a brilliant idea to highlight places which have receded in the mind and have been lost in the vicinity of metros and big towns.
    Atif Hanif,
    Lucknow

    Your delectable dissertation on Udupi satisfied my palate far more than the rest of the fare in the a la carte menu for the new year.The inspiring story of Kanakdasa has another parallel in Udupi’s recent history. It concerns John Higgins, the American Carnatic music virtuoso who was initially denied entry to the sanctum sanctorum because he was a ‘mlechcha’ (a foreigner). This time, however, the pujari himself relented after Higgins sang his magnum opus, Krishna, Nee Begano Baro..."
    K.R. Rangaswamy,
    North Carolina, US

    A wonderful collection and a collector’s item.
    D.B.N. Murthy,
    on e-mail

  • Brooking a Crook
    Jan 22, 2001

    Agreed that you are a known Vajpayee-baiter. But what makes you a fan of Quattrocchi? The article The Plot Chickens (January 8) projects him as innocent and a victim of politics whose only guilt is his proximity to the Gandhis. Why then has the Swiss court rejected his appeal not to grant access to his bank papers? Tell me honestly, do you have some truck with the Congress?

    Ashish Panda,
    Singapore

  • The Sinners of Year 2000
    Jan 22, 2001

    The Sinners of Year 2000
    Vinod Mehta, who changed the definition of God by 180 degrees in God is Back (August 21, 2000); Bill Clinton, who got off scot-free in his sex scandal; Ram Jethmalani, who has been a great lawyer for others but who failed to defend himself and had to resign from the  Union Cabinet.

    Parjan Kumar Jain,
    Delhi

  • Fast Train to the Nowhere Junctions
    Jan 22, 2001

    Congratulations on a great year-end issue. Seldom are Indian magazines embellished by such good writing as Soutik Biswas’ take on Pokaran (Sleeping with the Bomb)—he’s the first to point out that even the place is spelt wrong by the Indian state—and Sandipan Deb’s haunting piece on Naxalbari (Home to the Revolution).
    Chanchal Srivastava,
    Rochester, US

  • Fast Train to the Nowhere Junctions
    Jan 22, 2001

    It pained me to read that the new owners (the Khaitans) of the Plassey battleground have converted it into a sugarcane field (Amid Pride and Betrayal)! And were it not for the people of Plassey, they would have renamed it Khaitan Nagar. How can people be so indifferent to history? India is brimming with places of historical importance. If pursued with serious intent, tourism could well overtake IT as a major source of revenue. If only...
    Dipan Shah,
    on e-mail

  • The Sinners of Year 2000
    Jan 22, 2001

    Here's my list of the three sinners Vinod Mehta asks for in his Year-End Diary (January 8): Laloo Prasad Yadav; Azharuddin; Jayalalitha.

    S.C. Sivananjappa,
    Bangalore
    The Y2K Bug, the one which bit before biting and never let its sting felt; bcci, for being the most recalcitrant abettor of the cricket scam, and the rss, for not letting the sleeping worms of disharmony lie.

    Deepali Pawaskar,
    New Delhi

    My list of the saint-sinners of 2000: L.K. Advani; M.M. Joshi; Uma Bharati.

    Mahesh Inder Sharma,
    Delhi

    Bal Thackeray; Azharuddin; the US Supreme Court.

    Swati R. Naik,
    Mumbai

    The Indian population, which is up in arms whenever it gets a chance to malign the likes of Azhar, Jadeja or Narasimha Rao; the Indian army, whose sin was exposed in the Samba spy case; A.B. Vajpayee, who has committed the gravest sin while occupying the top post in the country.

    Vikas,
    New Delhi

    Osama bin Laden, for being a ruthless, anti-American, Saudi sadist; V. Prabhakaran for being violent and inhuman; Veerappan, for killing men and animals and holding people to ransom.

    K. Parvathi,
    Chennai

    BCCI chief A.C. Muthiah, for being the biggest tainter of cricket; M.F. Husain, for his obsession with Madhuri Dixit; Khushwant Singh, for his confessional self-portrait, In the Company of Women.

    V.. Gopal,
    Chennai

    All the sinners who have been exposed for corrupt deeds in Outlook all the year round would unanimously vote Vinod Mehta as the biggest sinner.

    C.M. Sadri,
    Kanpur

    RSS chief Sudarshan; UP chief minister Rajnath Singh and  the faceless TV channel that reported remarks Hrithik Roshan never made.

    S. Vaitheeswaran,
    Delhi

    Mohammed Azharuddin; Mohammed Azharuddin; Mohammed Azharuddin.

    L. Thomas Olakkengal,
    Thrissur, Kerala

    (Winners will be announced next week-Editor)



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