July 26, 2021
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Pakistan: Spanking The State’s Errant Children

That is what Pakistan's "war" against the Taliban in the NWFP is, and not a death blow to mortal enemies,  argues Praveen Swami, quoting military experts, in the Hindu:

...the Islamist jihad in Pakistan emerged not as an adversary of the government but as a product of the official Islam propagated by the state itself.

In a thoughtful 2002 essay, scholar Saeed Shafqat noted that groups like the Jamaat-ud-Dawa had profoundly influenced Pakistan’s “process of identity formation.” “Negating Islamic identity,” he argued, “is equated with opposing Pakistan.” “Over the years,” Shafqat argued, “the religio-political groups have become not only militant in responding towards imagined or real enemies — ‘the West’ or ‘India’— but have also become the champions of ‘Pakistan ideology’.”

Elite-led political organisations have failed to mount a coherent ideological challenge to this project — or to address the conditions in which Islamist groups have flourished. Lashkar recruitment in southern Punjab is known to prey on the increasingly angry children of landless peasants and the urban poor. In Pakistan’s north-west, too, disputes over land, resources and development have fed and informed the rise of the Taliban.
Read the full piece at the Hindu

Pakistan: Spanking The State’s Errant Children
outlookindia.com
1970-01-01T05:30:00+0530

That is what Pakistan's "war" against the Taliban in the NWFP is, and not a death blow to mortal enemies,  argues Praveen Swami, quoting military experts, in the Hindu:

...the Islamist jihad in Pakistan emerged not as an adversary of the government but as a product of the official Islam propagated by the state itself.

In a thoughtful 2002 essay, scholar Saeed Shafqat noted that groups like the Jamaat-ud-Dawa had profoundly influenced Pakistan’s “process of identity formation.” “Negating Islamic identity,” he argued, “is equated with opposing Pakistan.” “Over the years,” Shafqat argued, “the religio-political groups have become not only militant in responding towards imagined or real enemies — ‘the West’ or ‘India’— but have also become the champions of ‘Pakistan ideology’.”

Elite-led political organisations have failed to mount a coherent ideological challenge to this project — or to address the conditions in which Islamist groups have flourished. Lashkar recruitment in southern Punjab is known to prey on the increasingly angry children of landless peasants and the urban poor. In Pakistan’s north-west, too, disputes over land, resources and development have fed and informed the rise of the Taliban.
Read the full piece at the Hindu

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