June 02, 2020
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China: Tiananmen At Twenty

1989 is remembered for the collapse of a number of communist governments around the world. But before the wall came tumbling down later in the year, there was also the mind-numbing shock of several hundred unarmed civilians shot dead by the Chinese army during a military operation to suppress a democratic uprising by young students in Tiananmen Square.

Here's a BBC report on the massacre. And, of course, the famous iconic video footage and photographs of a lone man in a white shirt standing in front of a column of tanks which were attempting to drive out of Tiananmen Square

Also See: History Channel's Declassified documentary

***

And now, 20 years later, as the anniversary approaches, China has blocked Twitter, Flickr and Hotmail. An Internet crackdown blocks "young generation" as a leading dissident is detained in Beijing:

In a statement distributed by the same organisation, the exiled former student leader Chai Ling appealed for the release of political prisoners, an independent investigation into the events and permission for former student leaders to return home.

"The current generation of leaders who bear no responsibility should have the courage to overturn the verdicts [on the protests]," said Chai, who now lives in the US and has not commented on the issue for several years. [Read more at the Guardian]

Also read, Jeffrey Wasserstrom in the Nation:

In April and May of 1989, people around the world were inspired by the protests in Tiananmen Square, then horrified when the June 4 massacre turned Beijing streets into urban killing fields. China has changed enormously in the twenty years since then, but the Communist Party's attitude toward 1989 has remained constant. It insists there were no peaceful protests and no "massacre," just "counterrevolutionary riots" that were pacified by soldiers who showed great restraint. It refuses to acknowledge the losses to relatives of the hundreds of victims, tries to keep young Chinese ignorant of what happened and encourages specialists in the West to stop dwelling on 1989.

More here

China: Tiananmen At Twenty
outlookindia.com
1970-01-01T05:30:00+0530

1989 is remembered for the collapse of a number of communist governments around the world. But before the wall came tumbling down later in the year, there was also the mind-numbing shock of several hundred unarmed civilians shot dead by the Chinese army during a military operation to suppress a democratic uprising by young students in Tiananmen Square.

Here's a BBC report on the massacre. And, of course, the famous iconic video footage and photographs of a lone man in a white shirt standing in front of a column of tanks which were attempting to drive out of Tiananmen Square

Also See: History Channel's Declassified documentary

***

And now, 20 years later, as the anniversary approaches, China has blocked Twitter, Flickr and Hotmail. An Internet crackdown blocks "young generation" as a leading dissident is detained in Beijing:

In a statement distributed by the same organisation, the exiled former student leader Chai Ling appealed for the release of political prisoners, an independent investigation into the events and permission for former student leaders to return home.

"The current generation of leaders who bear no responsibility should have the courage to overturn the verdicts [on the protests]," said Chai, who now lives in the US and has not commented on the issue for several years. [Read more at the Guardian]

Also read, Jeffrey Wasserstrom in the Nation:

In April and May of 1989, people around the world were inspired by the protests in Tiananmen Square, then horrified when the June 4 massacre turned Beijing streets into urban killing fields. China has changed enormously in the twenty years since then, but the Communist Party's attitude toward 1989 has remained constant. It insists there were no peaceful protests and no "massacre," just "counterrevolutionary riots" that were pacified by soldiers who showed great restraint. It refuses to acknowledge the losses to relatives of the hundreds of victims, tries to keep young Chinese ignorant of what happened and encourages specialists in the West to stop dwelling on 1989.

More here

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