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<B>With Mulligatawny soup</b> Stills from BBC 4’s Indian Summers, set in Raj-era Simla <B>With Mulligatawny soup</b> Stills from BBC 4’s Indian Summers, set in Raj-era Simla <B>With Mulligatawny soup</b> Stills from BBC 4’s Indian Summers, set in Raj-era Simla <B>With Mulligatawny soup</b> Stills from BBC 4’s Indian Summers, set in Raj-era Simla Ayushman Khurana Shahrukh Khan during a press conference launching TV show, 'Poochega Sabse Shaana Kaun' in Mumbai, Maharashtra. J.K. Simmons accepts the award for best actor in a supporting role for “Whiplash” at the Oscars, Los Angeles. Sean Penn presents the award for best picture at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Common, foreground left, and John Legend, foreground right, perform at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Lady Gaga, left, and Julie Andrews speak at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. John Legend performs on stage at the Oscars  at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Scarlett Johansson speaks at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Jennifer Aniston and David Oyelowo present the award for best documentary feature at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. J.K. Simmons and Michelle Schumacher arrive at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Felicity Jones, right, presents Anna Pinnock with the award for best production design for “The Grand Budapest Hotel” at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Meryl Streep presents the in memoriam tribute at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Benedict Cumberbatch, right, presents Tom Cross with the award for best film editing for “Whiplash” at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Ben Affleck presents the award for best director at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Benedict Cumberbatch, left, and Naomi Watts present the award for best film editing at the Oscars on Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Julianne Moore accepts the award for best actress in a leading role for “Still Alice at the Oscars on Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Oprah Winfrey presents the award for best adapted screenplay at the Oscars on Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Pahlaj Nihalani <b>On The Orange Indian Carpet</b>
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This is actress Tina Desai, we declare, at the London world premiere of <i>The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel</i>, the seq­uel to John Madden's surprise 2012 hit with an almost identical name. The premiere's theme, and that of some of the actors' attires were, we understand, Indian. Tina and others preened, but the spotlight was for dames Judi Dench and Maggie Smith, as well as a sprinkling of royalty. Who? You guess. <b>Sing Us A Song, Laila</b>
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The movie is a period drama directed by Muzaffar Ali called <i>Jaanisar</i>, the feel is strikingly like <i>Umrao Jaan</i> (so you know) and the star Pernia Qureshi (daughter of meat exporter Moin Qureshi, he with the taxman's lens trained on him). Going by this, you think she'll pull it off? No? But the girl is confident! Shoaib Akhtar and Amitabh Bachchan while analysing the India-Pakistan world cup cricket match in Star Sports Mumbai studio. Kapil Dev, Akash Chopra and Amitabh Bachchan doing commentary during the India-Pakistan world cup cricket match from the Star Sports Studio in Mumbai, Maharashtra. Bollywood actor Amitabh Bachchan celebrates after India won their first match against Pakistan in ICC Cricket World Cup-2015, in Mumbai, Maharashtra. Bollywood actor Amitabh Bachchan celebrates after India won their first match against Pakistan in ICC Cricket World Cup-2015, in Mumbai, Maharashtra. <b>Pink of Health</b>
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Nimrat Kaur, whose graceful turn in <i>The Lunchbox</i> brought a certain spark to the cinemas, managed to get some rather well-deserved attention at the Bafta awards in London, what with her long pink gown with batwing sleeves. Georges Hobeika, if you must know. Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) men demolish the illegal ramp constructed outside actor Shahrukh Khan's Bandra bungalow ‘Mannat’ in Mumbai. <b>We Know That Girl</b>
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Sapna Pabbi's the name, <i>Khamoshiyan</i> is the game...er the film. The lass, part of the Bhatt factory sex-horror flick, says now that she got into a spat over the intense ero­tic scenes. Her exact words: They sho­uld know, I'm no Sunny Leone. TV actor Gautam Gulati took the Bigg Boss trophy and Rs.50 lakh cash prize after winning the season 8 of celebrity reality show Bigg Boss in Lonavala, Maharashtra. Wildlife filmmaker Ashwika Kapur Actress and AAP leader Gul Panag campaigns for the party candidate Som Dutt at the Sadar Bazar, in New Delhi.  Former president APJ Abdul Kalam talks with Kamala, widow of  cartoonists R K Laxman's at her residence in Pune, Maharashtra. Newly-wed couple Soha Ali Khan and Kunal Khemu along with family members Saif Ali Khan and Kareena Kapoor Khan in Mumbai. Newly-wed couple Soha Ali Khan and Kunal Khemu pose for photographs outside their residence in Mumbai. <b>Many Met By Starlight </b>
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When superstar trumvirate Rajni­kanth, Kamalahaasan and Amitabh Bachchan congregate at a function, they practically own the stalking lenses. At Mumbai, the three met, were gracefully self-effacing, then effusive about each other, and posed gamely for the obligatory batch of photos on the stage. But the occasion was, through the music launch of Ami­tabh-starrer <i>Shamitabh</i>, scored by Ilaiyaraja, a tribute to the veteran music-­man himself. Everyone was there, including Aishwarya Rai, who is being polite to the megastars. Bollywood actress Sri Devi along with actors Kamal Hasan and Rajinikant felicitating music director Ilaiyaraaja during the music launch of 'Shamitabh' in Mumbai. Lyricist Gulzar and Jaya Bachchan during the music launch of 'Shamitabh' in Mumbai. Rekha attends the wedding reception of Shatrughan Sinha's son Kush and Taruna Agarwal in Mumbai. Actor Rajinikanth and his daughter Aishwarya attend the wedding reception of Shatrughan Sinha's son Kush and Taruna Agarwal in Mumbai. Shatrughan Sinha and his daughter Sonakshi during the wedding reception of his son Kush and Taruna Agarwal in Mumbai. Shatrughan Sinha and his wife Poonam with son Luv and daughter Sonakshi during the wedding reception of their son Kush and Taruna Agarwal in Mumbai . <b>Children, Please! </b>
why can't moviestar kids  ever think beyond entering films and end up being forever (unfavourably) compared to a parent? But they won't be dissuaded. Must have been the case with Akshara Hassan, seen here with mom Sarika, at the trailer launch of her movie <i>Shamitabh</i>, starring Big B and Dhanush. Big launch, even for an eye-candy.  <b>Kate’s White On Red</b>
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If it's a blazingly head-turning gown worn with breezy chutzpah, has it to be a Versace? Kate Hudson's much admired hourglass-ribbed gown with an open swoop was caught up in a tangle of superlatives, and inevitably compared with a long-ago thrill: Liz Hurley's career-defining black dress with safety pins. In this image released by Fox Searchlight Pictures, Michael Keaton portrays Riggan in a scene from Birdman. The film was nominated for an Oscar Award for best feature. Dev Anand as Inspector Shekhar in <i>CID</i> (1956) probes an editor’s murder Satyajit Ray’s <i>Feluda</i> appeared in several films, including two by Ray Pankaj Kapur as <i>Karamchand</i> (1985-88) was quirky, funny, iconic Naseeruddin Shah plays Inspector Ghote in Zafar Hai’s <I>The Perfect Murder</i> Rajshri Deshpande <b>As Red Met Red</b>
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Let them dance with evident synchronicity at an awards do, that's what chemistry does. But Salman Khan and Jacqueline Fernandez, with the shadow of an alliance about them, are political animals too. Didn't they ‘campaign’ for Mahinda Rajapa­ksa before the polls in Sri Lanka? Just a favour for friend Namal Rajapaksa, they say!   SRK is the bumbling detective in the slapstick <i>Baadshah</i> (1999) Kamalahaasan’s Raghavan probes a murder in <i>Vettaiyadu Vilayadu</i> (’06) IG Geetha (Asha Sarath) finds her son in <i>Drishyam</i> (’13, Malayalam) <i>Pune</i> 52 (2013, Marathi), a noir, features Girish Kulkarni as sleuth Apte <b>Before A Shower</b> 
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The bathtub—one of the earliest tropes to portray sensuality in films and photos. What can indeed be more natural than a bathing beauty? Daboo Ratnani accessorises Parineeti Chopra with a comely pair of glasses and a truly menacing cigar. It's a soft-and-hard approach. But wouldn't a coiling waft of smoke have added to it? <i>Bobby Jasoos</i> (2014): Vidya Balan as girl-next-door detective Bilkis <i>CID</i> (1998 onwards) Features ACP Pradyuman, Abhijeet and Daya <b>Chokher Bali</b> (Bengali, 2003)
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Rabindranath Tagore’s eponymous novel on widowhood and patriarchy is the foil for Rituparno Chatterjee’s film. Widow Binodini (Aishwarya Rai) and new bride Ashalata (Raima Sen) give each other a common nickname ‘Chokher Bali’ (sand in the eye). The film is an interweave of their friendship, the man whose love they share, the mistrusts and falling out.
<b>Kunku</b> (Marathi, 1937)
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This V. Shantaram classic, based on Narayan Hari Apte’s novel <i>Na Patnari Goshta</i>, features the young and spunky Nirmala (Shanta Apte) who refuses to consummate her marriage to a much older man. Defined feminism before it became part of the popular lexicon, remade in Hindi as <i>Duniya Na Maane</i>.
<b>Ghatashraddha</b> (Kannada, 1977)
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The inspiration for Girish Kasaravalli’s debut film is a U.R. Ananthamurthy short story. Set in a 1920s Karnataka, it takes on Brahminism and rituals head-on. The film’s about a young widow, daughter of a schoolmaster, who finds herself pregnant after being seduced by a teacher. <b>Malaikallan</b> (Tamil, 1954)
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<i>Malaikallan</i> draws on a popular story by writer-poet Namakkal Kavignar that was a prescribed textbook in Tamil Nadu schools of the ’50s. M. Karunanidhi wrote the screenplay and dialogues for the swashbuckler MGR in the star lead. <B>Chemmeen</b> (Malayalam, 1965)
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The Ramu Karyat directed <i>Chemmeen</i> is based on Thakazhi Sivasankara Pillai’s highly acclaimed novel, set in Kerala fishing community. To acquire its rights, Karyat is to have paid a royal sum (those days) of Rs 8,000.
<b>Mathilukal</b> (Malayalam, 1989)
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Based on a love story by Vaikom Muhammad Basheer, the Adoor film is about the relationship between two inmates—Basheer (Mammootty) and Narayani (a voice)—who talk across the walls of their cells but never meet. <b>Agnisnaan</b> (Assamese, 1985)
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Bhabhendra Nath Saikia’s film is based on his own novel titled <i>Antareep</i>. It looks at the implications of a wealthy businessman’s decision to opt for a second marriage. The focus is on the first wife, the hurt and pain she feels at the “deception” and what all it leads her up to. <b>Apu Trilogy</b> (Bengali)
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Ray’s Apu trilogy—<i>Pather Panchali</i> (1955), <I>Aparajito</i> (1956) and <i>Apur Sansar</i> (1959)—was based on two Bangla  novels by Bibhutibhushan Bandopadhyay—<i>Pather Panchali</i> and <i>Aparajito</i>. The film traces Apu’s journey through love, loss and death. <b>Meghe Dhaka Tara</b> (Bengali, 1960)
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On the aftermath of the Partition of Bengal, Ghatak’s film, based on Shaktipada Rajguru’s novel, focuses on Neeta (Supriya Choudhury) who single-handedly bears the burden of her refugee family while facing her own tragedies and losses. <b>Anhey Ghorhey Da Daan</B> (Punjabi, 2011)
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On Punjabi novelist and Jnanpeeth winner Gurdial Singh’s novel, <i>Anhey Ghorhey...</i> focuses on the subordination of the Dalits with immense dignity and depth and is a landmark in Dalit cinema in the way it never spells things out but keeps them implicit. <b>The Namesake</B> (English, 2006)
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Directed by Meera Nair, Sooni Taraporevala scripted Jhumpa Lahiri’s <i>Namesake</i> for screen. Hallmarks: humanely observed characters, finely nuanced relationships, a sharply felt cross-cultural interaction. <b>Slumdog Millionaire</b> (English, 2008)
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Danny Boyle’s British film had everything Indian about it—setting, music, actors. The novel it was based on, <i>Q&A</i>, had been written by Indian diplomat Vikas Swarup and adapted for screen by Simon Beaufoy. <b>English, August</b> (English, 1988)
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Upamanyu Chatterjee himself adapted his own novel for screen alongwith Dev Benegal. IAS officer Agastya (Rahul Bose) is sent for training to Madna where he ends up feeling like a foreigner in his own country. <b>Guide</b> (Hindi, 1965)
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Based on R.K. Narayan’s novel, directed by Vijay Anand, <i>Guide</i> has Rosie (Waheeda), unhappily married to archaeologist Marco (Kishore Sahu), who finds love in Raju Guide (Dev Anand), hired by Marco for research work. <b>2 States</b> (Hindi, 2014)
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Bollywood sees a film in anything Chetan Bhagat writes. Abhishek Varman brings on screen the story of the marriage of Delhi-Punjabi boy Krish (Arjun Kapoor) with Chennai girl Ananya (Aalia Bhatt) and the reconciliation of culturally different families.
<b>Mehbooba</b> (Hindi, 1976)
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Pulp writer Gulshan Nanda wrote the screenplay for Shakti Samanta’s <i>Mehbooba</i> from his own novel <i>Sisakte Saaz</i>. About the time-worn theme of rebirth, Rajesh Khanna and Hema Malini play the star-crossed lovers who find a past life connect. <b>Junoon</b> (Hindi, 1978)
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Set in the backdrop of the 1857 sepoy mutiny, Shyam Benegal’s <i>Junoon</i> is an echo of Ruskin Bond’s novella, <i>A Flight of Pigeons</i>. It’s the story of the beautiful British woman Ruth Labadoor (Nafisa Ali) whose father is killed in church by rebels. <B>Ek Chadar Maili Si</B> (Hindi, 1986)
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A Sukhwant Dhadda film, based on Raj­inder Singh Bedi’s Urdu novella. It’s about Rano (Hema Malini), who is forced to marry brother-in-law Mangal (Rishi Kapoor), 10 years her junior, when her husband dies. <B>Suraj Ka Satvan Ghoda</B> (Hindi, 1993)
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Based on Dharamvir Bharti’s novel, Shyam Benegal’s abstract film showcases Manik (Rajat Kapoor) and the three women—Neena Gupta, Pallavi Joshi and Rajeshwari Sachdev—he meets at different points in his life.
<B>Devdas</B> (Various versions)
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Saratchandra Chatterjee’s novella has been adapted 16 times. From the 1927 silent version to four Hindi, three Bengali, two Telugu, one Assamese, one Malayalam and two each in Pakistan and Bangladesh. <b>Nirbhaya, A Play: </b>This crowd-funded show by Yael Farber made its debut in India a year after it toured the UK. Critics were divided on whether it took the issue of sexual violence forward to a logical conclusion, and whether it threw up more questions than answers, but where it made its impact was in bringing forward powerful, real-life testimonies of the actors, led by Poorna Jagannathan. <b>C Sharp C Blunt: </b>An Indo-German production, solo performer M.D. Pallavi’s turn as a mobile app married two the­mes: constant presence of tec­hnology and stereotyping of women in entertainment world. <b>Trivial Disasters:</b> Atul Kumar returned with a twisted, urban play based on Ajay Krishnan’s comic sketches. Plenty theatre of the absurd tricks, turning real-life
situations upside down. <b>Boiled Beans on Toast:</B> Girish Karnad’s thought-provoking Kannada play on Bangalore’s transformation saw two stage adaptations: Mohit Takal­kar’s Marathi version and Lill­ete Dubey’s English one. <b>Happy Birthday Sunita:</b> Shabana Azmi plays Tejpal in the Pravesh Kumar-directed play, in which she portrays a dedicated mother of two grown children in a
foreign land. Dibakar Banerjee, Filmmaker Dia Mirza, Actress Sorabh Pant, Stand-up comedian Zohra Sehgal Suchitra Sen <b>Arnie’s Calling </b>
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Seek no answer to the obvious question—what made Arnold Schwarzenegger visit Chennai for the audio launch of a movie? His spell was cast over the CM as well as this gushing policeman. But for TV, he had that wooden expression. <b>What Does He Think?</b>
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They would not add grist to the gossip mill; they will keep this ‘pure’; they will maintain dignity in the face of audacious doofuses with cameras and chavs armed with bluntness.... And with the diktat aginst GFs, Virat and Anushka won’t meet at Australia. Undeterred gossipers shake their heads. <b>Bond Gets Stronger</b>
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She turned heads, within and without, in <i>Malena</i>. After that, each film had something to offer manhood in the way of encouragement  to imagine more, then more still. Monica Bellucci, we hear, is the new Bond girl. At 50, she is also the...but no, age shall not wither her; we shall cherish her with the long shadows of our youth. <b>Me, We On The Mirror</b>
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Selfies caught the eye, indulged themselves shamelessly and distorted beautiful people, like the Oscar sel­fie Jennifer, Bradley, Julia, Brad, Meryl...and all looking delightedly sub-par. But where humans disappoint, the natural world comes to the rescue. The Macaque selfie cheered us up, for seldom do you see an ape in such an unself-conscious state. <b>Door Stepper</b>
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Did this tiger burn bright? Many had predicted he would.  Tiger Shroff’s film <i>Heropanti </i> defied expectation to do only  average ‘business’. With the horror (okay ladies, delight) of steely man-curves balancing that sensitive mien, Jackie’s son may yet break into the ‘promising’ category. All he needs are two hit songs. <b>Into Waist-Training</b>
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Do you think she is fat? Actually, no, except in her overpraised nether regions—paraded, prodded and photographed over the past Twittered decade. In 2014, <i>Paper</i> magazine opted for cheap public­ity by having Kim trotting out her precious hindquarters for another sunning. The resultant buzz was jaded even at its first, annoying appearance. <b>Dedh Ishqiya:</b> <i>“Sherwani ke andar nawaab bhi taang rakha hai kya?” “Begum kaagazi hain”</i> Aalia Bhatt in <i>Highway</I> <b>Anil George</B> as the horror filmmaker in <I>Miss Lovely</i> and villain’s sidekick in <i>Mardani<i> <b>Begum Para-Munira</b> (Madhuri Dixit-Huma Qureshi) in <i>Dedh Ishqiya</i> <b>Bhootnath-Akhrot</b> (Big B and Parth) in <i>Bhootnath Returns</i> <b>Maya Sarao</b> as Sanjay Mishra’s lively daughter in <i>Aankhon Dekhi</i> Parineeti Chopra in <i>Hasee to Phansee</i> <b>Haider:</b> “Chutzpah” <b>The Xpose:</b> <i>“Na dance, na expression, na pose; kewal expose.”</i> 
Vidya Balan in <i>Bobby Jasoos</i> <b>Tahir Bhasin<b> as the hip, Breaking Bad-watching, iPad-carrying villain in <i>Mardani</i> <b>Deepak-Vishnu Sir</b> (Rajkummar Rao-Manav Kaul) in <i>Citylights</i> <b>Bikram-Bala</b> (Ranveer Singh and Arjun Kapoor) in <i>Gunday</i>
Rani Mukherjee in <i>Mardani</i> <B>Singham Returns:</b> <I>“Jab 47,000 policewale jagte hain to do crore Mumbaiwale sote hain.”</i> <B>Bang Bang:</B> <i>“Meri zip kholo aur meri gun nikaalo.”</i> Ahem! Priyanka Chopra in <i>Mary Kom</i> Deepika Padukone in <i>Finding Fanny</I> Haider <b>Film of the year</b> <i>Court</i>, Chaitanya Tamhane’s satire on the Indian legal system.
<b>Also-ran</b> Karthik Subbaraj’s <i>Jigarthanda</i> (Tamil) Srijit Mukherji’s <i>Chatushkone</i> (Bengali). <b>The mainstream Hindi film that spoke to me</B> Queen. “Hungama ho gaya” all the way. <b>Aalia Bhatt</b> Showed her acting chops in <i>Highway</i>, gave hits in <I>Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania, 2 States</i> <b>Siddharth Malhotra</b> From sensitive loverboy in <i>Hasee to Phansee</i> to the intense, brooding <i>Ek Villain</i>, Bollywood’s new wonder boy <b>Shraddha Kapoor</b> Acted, and sang the immensely popular <i>Teri Galiyan</i> in <i>Ek Villain</i>. Then returned for a splendid take in <i>Haider</i>. <b>Varun Dhawan</b> Did a Govinda turn in <i>Main Tera Hero</i>. Stepped into SRK shoes in <i>Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania</i> <b>Her Star Shines In Karachi</b>
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Where you have seen her before? In Pakistani serial <i>Humsafar</i>, and in Shoaib Mansoor's <i>Bol</i>. The Karachi-based Mah­ira Khan is now plucked out and put in Faces, bang opposite  Shahrukh. Which is fabulous, but spare an eye for the zipper in that saree. Or is that a gown? But it becomes her; what won't? We don't mind. Arijit Singh <b>Do The Tattoo Talk</b>
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While her beau is contemplating a drastic attack to counter ferocious missiles by Mitchell Johnson, Anus­hka Sharma is left behind to deal with the vicious turn delivered over at her end by all. The topic? The by-now-hackneyed relationship with Virat Kohli. Her personal life is out of bounds for a prying media, our lady of the stripes fumed.    Actor Aamir Khan with his son as Tennis Star Roger Federer and actress Deepika Padukone look on during the IPTL in New Delhi. <i>Breaking Bad</i>’s Bryan Cranston on the <i>GOT</i> throne <b>London noir</b> Cumberbatch with his Watson in <i>Sherlock</i> <b>Are you home tonight?</b> <I>Homeland</i>’s Nicolas Brody, played by Damian Lewis Ashutosh Gowarikar <b>Knock Her Door</b>
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Now can you believe, those of you with no qualms about watching a film titled <i>Kuch Kuch Locha Hai</i>, the potential for serious catfights between the lea­ding ladies? For Sunny Leone plays a filmstar, and our lady—Evelyn Sha­rma—on the right a ‘girl-next-door’. What's the probability of a girl like this next door? Tell us, we'd move a few doors. <b>Is Seeing Believing?</b>
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We won't repeat the particulars of Arpita Khan's wedding from last week—the pomp and pageantry, the heavenly descent of stars.... On the sidelines of the bash was this snap of genuine affection between Salman and Jacqueline, with Parmeshwar Godrej as spectator. So, Is Jackie the name (of his latest flame)? <b>Camera Winsome</b>
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When she trickled on to movies, following the well-worn route from modelling, did Bollywood watching hawk-eyes give Esha Gupta a staying certificate? After <i>Jannat 2</i> and <i>Raaz 3D</i>, her newest appearance is in a men's mag, with the Kingfisher model in her sultriest element, trying hard to please, archly whispering, ‘cheese....' <b>Looking inside</b> From <i>Nirnay</i>, Pushpa Rawat’s quiet and honest look at her life A scene from <i>Nabarun</i> <b>Mona’s Luck</b>
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What happens when a yoga instructor thinks she can act? Or others, seeing how she pairs stylish jackets with unconventional wear, insist that she can? In Chennai, Anushka Shetty, 33, ended up in a movie, <i>Lingaa</i>, opposite Rajnikanth, 63. Has a yoga instructor ever been endowed with such largesse? The song <i>Mona Gasolina</i> will show what she does with it. Union Minister for Finance, Corporate Affairs and Information & Broadcasting, Arun Jaitley at the inauguration of the National Children’s Film Festival, in New Delhi. 
Tennis player, Sania Mirza and actress Sakshi Tanwar are also seen.
 Tannishtha Chatterjee <b>Get Back Into The Water</b>
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A naive girl who suffers from attention deficit? Going by the attention-seeking pic on the left, Lisa Haydon can cure a few suffering the ghastly disorder. But that's her role in <I>The Shaukeens</i>, where her golden-hearted turn so affected our rev­iewer that she had a hard time keeping her wits together. Cyrus Broacha Rajkumar Hirani and Aamir Khan <b>Sticky hands</b> Hirani was an ad industry man for long, seen here himself in an ’80s Fevicol ad <b>Rain on me, man</b> Aamir Khan and Anoushka Sharma in a still from <i>PK</i> Raju with his father Suresh Hirani <b>Put On Your Prancing Shoes</b>
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What lies behind that easy grin of Parineeti? What lies under Ranveer Singh's painful cowboyhood? Remember the tasteless joke, belittling harassment, she pulled at Big Boss house? And to think that all this playing at Indians-cowboys was for promoting a tiredly named film called <i>Kill Dil</i>. Would turn out to be bosh anyway.  <b>Look Who’s Sayin’ Hello</b>
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Samantha! She's the actress people are talking in hushed tones about in Chennai—for snazzling movies with Surya, Vikram and Vijay in the same year. Her immediate prayer? That <I>Kaththi</i>, the one with Vikram, turns out well. <b>Tell me when?</b> Vijay and Samantha get cosy Deepika Padukone <b>No Shame In Radio Ga Ga</b>
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PK! That commonest of initials so readily adopted as a moniker by friends-colleagues now names a film. Rajkumar Hirani, Aamir, Anushka Sharma and Vidhu Vinod Chopra do a photo op. Going by the props, it's an icky throwback to the hotch-potch '80s. <b>Time To Play Footie</b> 
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There you go, for all of you who were silently condemning the lot of us for adding a love-frazzled mind to the list of batting defects for Virat's Kohli's terrible form. The scene in the gallery at an FC Goa match in the ISL—an anxiously engrossed co-owner Kohli, with Anushka on the side, also keeping vigil. <p><span class=fspchannelhome>Filmmaker</span><br />
<strong>Dibakar Banerjee</strong></p>
<p>No smartphones for me, I need a mobile only to text and make calls. As a receiver of popular wisdom from all corners of mediocrity, I am fascinated by the random SMSes I get. Early in the morning, when you are on the pot, flashes one from the Brahmakumaris: “Silence is the fence around wisdom. If your foot slips, you can regain your balance. But if your tongue slips, you can never recall the word. Gud Mrng.” I presume, by recall they mean retract, but ‘Gud Mrng’?</p> <p><span class=fspchannelhome>Actor</span><br />
<strong>Aamir Khan</strong></p>
<p>The one thing I’d say about mobile phones is that they are damaging. Damaging to our hea­­lth, work, relationships, to us enjoying a fulfilling life and enjoying anything we do (small things like reading, taking a walk, talking to friends...). Damag­ing! Period! The sooner we stop using them the better. Say I, typing out my answer on a mobile!</p> <p><span class=fspchannelhome>Actress<br />
</span><strong>Gauhar Khan</strong></p>
<p>My dad gifted me my first mobile, a cool red Motorola, when I was in class 11. I almost broke it by dropping it soon after. The one time I was without a mobile for long was in the <em>Bigg Boss</em> house. I didn’t miss it.</p> <p><span class=fspchannelhome>Filmmaker</span><br />
<strong>Sandip Ray</strong></p>
<p>Only two of us in the Bengali film ind­ustry haven’t succumbed to the cha­rms of the mobile. Me and Saswata Chatterjee (Bob Biswas in <em>Kahaani</em>). I don’t need one. I work from home; and a landline sits atop my desk, which I always pick up. When I go for outdoor shoots there are some 200 cellpho­nes between the 80-90-people unit.</p> <p><span class=fspchannelhome>Actress<br />
</span><strong>Roopa Ganguly</strong></p>
<p>In 2011, I was in Mumbai and had gone out with friends for a movie. While exiting the hall, my mobile slipped out of my grasp. I was frantic, for it had messages from well-known people I did not want anyone to see. I headed back, woke up the guards and offered Rs 5,000 if they found it. One of them fished it out of a trash bag. It was money well-spent.</p> <p><span class=fspchannelhome>Theatreperson</span><br />
<strong>Makarand Deshpande</strong></p>
<p>I am notorious for not answering my phone; it is usually on silent. I do respond on text messages. However, as a performer or director I no longer tell the audience to put their phones off or on silent. Earlier it used to bother me, but I think I have adapted to the disturbance.</p> <p><span class=fspchannelhome>Poet, lyricist, writer and filmmaker</span><br />
<strong> Gulzar</strong></p>
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<img src=http://www.outlookindia.com/images/gulzar_hindi_20141103.jpg> <b>Total immersion</b> Shan Ghosh, a Salman impersonator, has fans of his own Shan Ghosh performance <b>Break it up</b> RGV, Nagarjuna and Amala at the 25 years celebration of Shiva in Hyderabad <b>Ends In A Huddle</b>
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Behold the new filmmaking community in a communal clinch—smart, confident, sassy, globally attuned and with a fair share of, we hope, talent. Certainly the impression conveyed by (Lto R) Ranvir Shorey, Ileana D'Cruz, Kalki Koechlin, Saif and Dinesh Vijan during a celebratory selfie for the film Happy Ending. <b>Slow Poison</b>
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She was one of the new-age pioneers, those who plunged into Bollywood in its early years of global fame. After prompting praise for her steely, athletic bea­uty (a mad dash in a Reebok ad outperformed Dhoni), her films limped and laboured at the BO. Bruna Abdullah herself, as seen, does not have to labour much. Rahul Khanna Haider 2014 Tahaan 2008 Harud 2010 I Am 2010 <b>Click My Photo</b>
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At one-and-a-half years, it is the right age for a grand debut for a star scion. It was Id-ul-Zuha, and Shahrukh, moved by the festive spirit to give his fans something, shared a picture of his son Abram on Twitter. A favourite toy clutched in each hand, Abram looks at the camera with poise. That's a gift. <b>As Actors Prepare</b>
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It's not a new film that merits Sonakshi's inclusion this week, but gossip and accompanying whispers that typically confirm it, that force our hand. It's strongly believed that Sonakshi is in a relationship with actor Arjun Kapoor and that they've taken holidays together. They are both simple, honest and love their food (no, don't smirk), says a source. <b>Top Hat, Coat-Tails</b>
<p> 
So what's the dishiest of all under-appreciated Bollywood starlets doing at the <i>GQ</i> Men of the Year Awards? Lending it mood? Imparting it class? Enlivening the stifling atmosphere of biceps and sharp casuals with a dash of sass? That is all true baby, except they ought to have taught Nargis Fakhri how to handle a guitar.  <b>As Required By A Top Boss</b>
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Right, if you are thinking about it, that manoeuvre by Ujjwala Raut requires great flexibility. After a forgettable outing in movies like <i>The Xpose</i> following a happy modelling career, Ujjwala has taken the significant decision of joining <i>Big Boss 8</i>. “Just to have fun, says she, leaving us aghast. <b>Cop act</b> Salman Khan dances at a Mumbai police function in 2012