Wednesday 24 August 2016
facebook.com/Outlookindia twitter.com/outlookindia digimag.outlookindia.com instagram.com/outlookindia youtube.com/user/OutlookMagazine

Wronged Man

D'Souza tries to understand why a man trained in medicine would spend his life with people who have fallen off the collective conscience of a nation.
The Curious Case Of Binayak Sen
By Dilip D'Souza
HarperCollins | Pages: 179 | Rs. 250

How do you begin to understand a man like Binayak Sen? For writers, that would be an exercise in empathy and understanding. What makes a man trained in medicine from Christian Medical College, Vellore—where students will have you know that community is king and who are taught to serve the community well—go and spend his life with people both ailing and healthy, but who have fallen off the collective conscience of a nation?

Now, that is a question that is posed by writers like Dilip D’Souza who seek to engage with Sen. But if you are the government of India, you won’t spend time agonising over this. You, as representatives of the people of India, will assume the worst and prefer to have the man incarcerated, preferably for life, especially because he chose to work in Chhattisgarh, a state blighted by Maoism.

D’Souza’s question is troubling, as answers are hard to come by. The book charts Binayak Sen’s story, beginning with his arrest in 2007, when he stood accused by the state and stood charged with sedition—the worst offence a citizen of the country can be charged with—and accused of being a go-between for a jailed Naxalite leader and a businessman, to his eventual release in 2011, when the Supreme Court set him free.

D’Souza dips into news reports to understand Sen, and the book is sprinkled with accounts of Sen’s constant engagement with issues like malnutrition and power. He contrasts this with the image of a doctor which the prosecution, the state, sought to create by questioning Sen’s credentials to be a doctor. The state was trying its best to conclude that Sen was a doctor only in name. In examining the case against Sen, D’Souza is scathing about the evidence that was shored up by the plaintiff to bring the man down. After having spent time in jail, Sen had to be set free—for “appallingly weak evidence”.

READ MORE IN:
AUTHORS: Anuradha Raman
PEOPLE: Binayak Sen
SECTION: Books
SUBSECTION: Reviews
OUTLOOK: 10 December, 2012
Download the Outlook ​Magazines App. Six magazines, wherever you go! Play Store and App Store

Post a Comment

You are not logged in, please Log in or Register
  • Daily Mail
THE LATEST ISSUE
CLICK IMAGE FOR CONTENTS
REVIEW
Extract
How a brutal LTTE directive was lost in the static of intelligence
MAGAZINE August 18, 2016
Review
A RBI governor remembers his doughty fights, but cuts down on the math
MAGAZINE August 11, 2016
Book Extract
Abused by a relative at six, Laxmi saw how patriarchy tried to crush her femininity. And she made it come back to crush them, ‘those straight men with wives and kids’.
MAGAZINE August 10, 2016
Review
Woven around the many facets of Shashi Kapoor whom most readers would have known only as a star.
MAGAZINE August 04, 2016
Review
The value of Visvanathan’s essays lie in their playfully fresh insights
MAGAZINE August 04, 2016
read more>>>
OUTLOOK ON TWITTER
POLLS

Finally, political parties came together to pass the Goods and Services Tax in the Rajya Sabha. The much-vaunted tax reform is said to have turned India into one common market. It is said that the GST will replace more than 15 state and federal taxes. So will GST lead to #AchcheDin?

POLL STARTED ON: Aug 04, 2016
Quiz
Brazil’s Rio de Janeiro is hosting the 31st Olympic Games from August 5 to 21. This is the first Olympics being held in South America and is going on even as a majority Brazilians are unhappy with their rulers. Here’s a quiz on some random Olympic facts and related trivia.
QUIZ STARTED ON: Aug 11, 2016
Advertisement