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No, it wasn't a frustrated or failed aspirant but a former IITian who said this last week at a lecture, while addressing a crowd of nearly a thousand IITians.


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1/D-1
Feb 02, 2007
12:01 AM
I don't get it - is he saying that after getting such an 'exclusive' and expensive education, IIT grads must do like him and go fix bikes for a living? As for staying in India, that's up to them, but the fact is, a stint in the developed West give these folks a better handle on doing things, while boosting their bank accounts, allowing them the opportunity to come back home and do their 'thing' with more confidence. It also shows his bias and ignorance, for, if the US education system had collapsed, as he puts it, why would so many phoren kids be rushing to attend their universities? Sour grapes? As for shortage of tecnologist and scientists, the fact is, most Americans don't see the great value in spending the best years of their lives stuck doing research when they can get a well-paying job and have fun. As for 'cheap service to the US', it's precisely this 'cheap service' which has catapulted India into it's present economic boom - as they say, 'one should not look a gift-horse in the mouth', nor, 'bite the hands that feed you'. And, it's not necesary nor cool to stoop to such denigration in order to champion high ideals - India right now can do without such unneccessary, unadulterated peurile bilge.
Bodh
Springfield, United States
2/D-5
Feb 02, 2007
12:02 AM
I have several problems with Mr Roy's address. First, what's wrong in working for Microsoft? Is it such an evil corporation? Second, what is wrong if a few go on to make a lot of money? Why is Mr. Roy jealous? Third, most IITians are from the metros (maybe more than 80%). Expecting them to solve rural problems is foolish. Nobody expects New Yorkers to solve the problems of Idaho.

As far as I know, humanities are still a much larger part of the IIT curriculum than your average engineering college. Indians should definitely admire those working for India from within and not just material wealth. Why blame IITs for the faults of the society and the elite?

If engineers are not decision makers and don't dictate what society and government does, then why blame them for the ills of society.

Finally, what "collapse of the US education system". It is the SUCCESS of the US economy that it has created so many opportunities for its own citizens and those from abroad. The US still produces a large number of very well trained college graduates in all fields both in absolute terms and on a per capita basis.
Ashish K
Cambridge, USA
3/D-9
Feb 02, 2007
12:03 AM
1)What happens to IITians is that they move within their circles very well. You should go overseas , where an IIT background academic will prefer an IIT undergraduate for further studies as his or her student. There are many instances where IITians have run down non-IIT background students to the higher ups , even if the student is good. Now what happens is that the higher authorities will believe the IITian , because of the reputation created by their pioneers. So it is living on reputation which counts. How can they understand the laws of motion of society , they will understand , the laws of motion of science as well as how their flock is in motion.
2) It would be interesting to make a survey as to how many IITians work in DRDO, ISRO, BARC or many of the leading institutions in India. This will give a good picture as to how they have contributed to India.
3) The provocative title ......... fools is not correct. They go thru a rigorous entrance test ( after the reservation rule, whether there will be dumming down the rigour has to be seen) and they are trained well in the IIT's.
3) Only they have to change their atitude towards non-IITians in their external world, otherwise it will be I and only I and Technology, which will see them go in the tangential direction in the circle of societal motions.
gajanan
Sydney, Australia
4/D-11
Feb 02, 2007
12:04 AM
I think the author is a case of an enlarged ego. Every person is free to steer his or her own life. The author deserves respect for his decision to go and work with the poor in the villages but his insistence that the government force all IITians to do the same is a case of sour grapes. If the government wishes to retain technical talent in the country then it should create such opportunities for them. It is foolish to expect highly trained engineers and scientists to work in a low tech environment. Some, like the author, may choose to do so on their own accord. But there is nothing wrong in people seeking challenging and rewarding work opportunities that do justice to their training. I am not a IItian myself but I don't begrudge people who try to better their own lives on the basis of their talent, brains and training.
Avinash
Mumbai, India
5/D-12
Feb 04, 2007
12:05 AM
i admire what dunu roy said, will it lead to change in curriculum, i am not sure though. i wish, there is change

anil
anil k gupta
ahmedabad, India
6/D-15
Feb 04, 2007
12:06 AM
The hubris expressed here in attacking the speaker is stunning, and deserves not just contempt, but a thorough, detailed response.

Bodh says: "is he saying that after getting such an 'exclusive' and expensive education, IIT grads must do like him and go fix bikes for a living?"

Providing technological leadership for critical governance questions is 'fixing bikes' while speaking a false accent and fixing a redneck's spyware-ridden comp is... economic boom?

"As for 'cheap service to the US', it's precisely this 'cheap service' which has catapulted India into it's present economic boom - as they say, 'one should not look a gift-horse in the mouth', nor, 'bite the hands that feed you'."

The point here is about leadership. IIT is meant to provide _technological leadership_ for the country. India needs technology; I'll put this extremely bluntly, but we're the world's largest basket case. We have the world's largest number of malnourished people. We have enormous strain on our resources. We need technology to scale our operations up. In short, we need technology.

To repeat: we need technology.

"India right now can do without such unneccessary, unadulterated peurile bilge."

Project much? Looks like someone needs lessons in, not just humility, but also logic and spelling.

"Second, what is wrong if a few go on to make a lot of money? Why is Mr. Roy jealous? "

The true cost of my CS degree (from an international university) and that of an IIT degree is roughly the same. And yet, I paid (am paying) close to 80% of the cost to educate myself. An IIT-ian pays much much less, more like 20% perhaps.

It's not called 'jealousy'. It's called 'lament at those who skim the surface off the Indian taxpayer's money'.

"Third, most IITians are from the metros (maybe more than 80%). Expecting them to solve rural problems is foolish. Nobody expects New Yorkers to solve the problems of Idaho."

The sheer hubris, incalculable class consciousness, and ironic stupidity expressed in this statement deserves no further comment.

"As far as I know, humanities are still a much larger part of the IIT curriculum than your average engineering college"

Alas, we've missed the point totally, haven't we. An earlier curriculum used to train engineers to be critical thinkers. The current curriculum trains them to be soulless automatons. It's not about humanities versus science/engineering, it's about training you to think.

"Finally, what "collapse of the US education system""

Failing standards in urban schools, and falling numbers for tech-school intake is a problem that's been much commented upon. Finding URL's on this issue is left as an exercise to the reader.
Akshay
Hyderabad, India
7/D-17
Feb 04, 2007
12:07 AM
I'm afraid Dunu Roy's comments would be forgotten by the IITians of IIT Bombay. Having watched the undergrads at this 'temple of technology', (as Jawaharlal Nehru would have referred to an IIT) I feel that the government should stop funding these institutions. Ethics, values and society be damned, everyone, from the student to his Prof. is looking for ways to make a fast buck. Who has the time to think of the country?
Vishwanath Rao
Bangalore, India
8/D-19
Feb 04, 2007
12:08 AM
"Having watched the undergrads at this 'temple of technology', (as Jawaharlal Nehru would have referred to an IIT) I feel that the government should stop funding these institutions. Ethics, values and society be damned, everyone, from the student to his Prof. is looking for ways to make a fast buck."

Somehow, I think you're living in a different era and times.

As long as they're being "ethical" - its great that the younger generation is focusing on their career and ambitions. Giving back to society in small ways starts happening ten years after graduation...many IITians and folks from other elite institutes do this.

As long as these kids focus on making themselves successful - they will have time to come back and contribute in many different ways and believe me, most generations of IITians/REC-ians do so, irrespective of what folks like Dunu would like to pontificate about.

Its easy to pick a name or two like Kanwal Rekhi - but every Indian sucess abroad who contributes in terms of ideas, money, charity, business, activism or business development is making a difference.

This notion that only those who gave up everything and "took to fixing bikes" can contribute is at best wrong headed - and knowing Dunu Roy's politics, probably harmful in some cases.

Let young Indians focus on succeeding wildly - they will find ways to contribute to India - again remember, that contributing back to India happens in many different forms and shapes and it is incrrect to pass judgement on what is superior and inferior.
lookout bug me not
mumbai, India
9/D-21
Feb 04, 2007
12:09 AM
This attitude of denegerating students of IITs,IIMs etc is just to criticise any thing about INDIA.I have met many many IITians and other Professionals from top elite Schools.I FOUND THEM DEEPLY COMMITED TO WELFARE OF INDIA and if we talk of pay back-what about Billions coming as remittances ?
Further do we want the Top performers to work under politicsed Beurus or corrupt Politicians ?
SAM PITRODA WORKED FOR RE.1 SALARY AND REVOLUTIONISED OUR TELEPHONE SECTOR.
ASK HIM if he IS HAPPY WITH INDIAN CULTURE ? I REMEBER an instance when he lifted from his owned company one critically needed spare costing worth 800 dollars-EVEN NATIONAL DAILIES WENT TO TOWN SAM FAVOURING Paronising his own co.-no three quotes ,-even a question was raised in Legistraure--

GIVE A CHANCE TO THOSE WHO REGULARLY CRITICISE IITIANS TO SEND their wards out- see how they jump at offer--
A K GHAI
MUMBAI, India
10/D-29
Feb 05, 2007
12:10 AM
If IITians Are Big Fools then the rest of the population are morons.

My humble suggestion to the jackass who made this remark is to see a psychiatrist as soon as possible.
Supriyo Mitra
Bangalore, India
11/D-32
Feb 05, 2007
12:11 AM
akshay says
Providing technological leadership for critical governance questions is 'fixing bikes' while speaking a false accent and fixing a redneck's spyware-ridden comp is... economic boom?

er.. thats the indians' definition of economic boom. but all that is besides the point.
if fixing a red necks spyware ridden comp provides a better living for the population then why not do it?


The point here is about leadership. IIT is meant to provide _technological leadership_ for the country. India needs technology; I'll put this extremely bluntly, but we're the world's largest basket case. We have the world's largest number of malnourished people. We have enormous strain on our resources. We need technology to scale our operations up. In short, we need technology.

and dunu roys of the world fixing bikes gives us that technology?


The true cost of my CS degree (from an international university) and that of an IIT degree is roughly the same. And yet, I paid (am paying) close to 80% of the cost to educate myself. An IIT-ian pays much much less, more like 20% perhaps.

regardless of how much the govt pays for an
iit-an's education, its their "fundamental" right to be able to choose their course.
There are many other ways of giving back to society than fixing bikes in villages.


It's not called 'jealousy'. It's called 'lament at those who skim the surface off the Indian taxpayer's money'


Really? whose policy is it? Not the students'.
Let them make themselves comfortable first. That way they will be able to help the society better.



The sheer hubris, incalculable class consciousness, and ironic stupidity expressed in this statement deserves no further comment.


On this one.. agreed.


Failing standards in urban schools, and falling numbers for tech-school intake is a problem that's been much commented upon. Finding URL's on this issue is left as an exercise to the reader


The american education system still has a much greater output in terms of technology, something we so badly need.
chester pester
timbaktoo, timbaktoo
12/D-26
Feb 06, 2007
12:12 AM
People the likes of Akshay from Hyderabad and Parthasarathy Chennai wear their false pride and misplaced nationalism like a badge of honor, always at the ready to defend against any and all criticisms. Chances are, they've never lived or studied outside of India, hence their hidebound, insular and xenophobic mentality - yes, thank goodness some Indians had the good fortune of being able to study and live abroad (Gandhi, Nehru, Manmohan Singh et al), and return home with a different mindset, otherwise India would still be a totally undeveloped, backward land stuck somewhere in the twelfth century. So, instead of blindlyrushing to defend against every perceived slight, a deeper introspection might reveal what you already know, but refuse to admit - despite her 'red-hot, booming economy', India still cannot provide enough jobs of the caliber nor the work or lifestyle experience availabale in the developed, economically advanced nations. To each his own - nuff said.
Bodh
Springfield, United States
13/D-30
Feb 06, 2007
12:13 AM
Mr Roy is absolutely right.But there is another dimension I would like to point out.West used to import the raw materials from their colonies and then sell finished products back to them whcih resulted in developement of the west and the degradation of the east.America plucked in the scientific talent from India and china and sold back their goods to us.Besides they used their technology to become economicaly and militarily powerful to subjugate the rest of the nations,carry out assasinations and keep many developing and poor countries in perpetual misery.For India to gain equal footing the scientists must ensure that the technology does not go back to USA and if it does, it should be done in our terms in order to benefit our country..
nasar
Raleigh, USA
14/D-44
Feb 07, 2007
12:14 AM
Well...I guess the person who said that has seen just one of the many dimensions that exist.He has no idea to what extent the alumni of these institutes strive for things like rural development et al.
And someone please tell him that in order to do good to the people out there in the villages one need not go there and do it personally.
krishna
chennai, India
15/D-48
Feb 07, 2007
12:15 AM
Akshay,
You write "The sheer hubris, incalculable class consciousness, and ironic stupidity..."
You have misunderstood. I belong to one of the small fraction of IITians from a small town background (It is a sad comment on the entrance exams/schooling system which privilege the urban kids - but that is another story) If you re-read my post now you will know what I mean. I would rather that Saifuddin Soz fix water problems in my district than Dunu Roy. Chester Pester, Lookout Bug Me Not have addressed most of your other criticisms.

About my comment on humanities, Dunu Roy, was lamenting the decline of humanities by saying that IITs are now producing 'unreal' technologists ("soulless automatons" in your words). It is unclear to me if there has been a large decline in the humanities curriculum. As I wrote earlier- it is still higher than other engineering colleges. Those engineering colleges should strive to the IIT humanities ratio. Further, it is unclear how additional humanities courses would produce patriots capable of solving the nations problems. Are the millions of humanities graduates that India produces more inclined to serve the public?

"Alas, we've missed the point totally, haven't we. An earlier curriculum used to train engineers to be critical thinkers."

Really! Has there been a great move away from 'critical thinking' in the engineering curriculum of India? (Actually- has there been any movement at all in any direction?) Are the Indian engineers of today more 'soulless' or corrupt? Do you have any examples of 'critical thinking' from the past Indian engineers which you find lacking in today's graduates? If anything, Indian engineers have more opportunities for 'critical thinking' today (even if they don't find such opportunities in the high tech sector), than in the past when their only options were PWD/Irrigation departments (not exactly the bastions of selfless national service and 'critical thinking').
Ashish K
Cambridge, USA
16/D-26
Feb 08, 2007
12:16 AM
The IIT were established with tax-payer's money, and they have the greatest right to question how their money is spent. It is a sad fact that the IITs lag behind innovations and fundamental research. Just how many IITians end up doing PhD and heading research laboratories? How many join corporations or go for business management programs? the answer to these will make it amply clear who majority of IItians work for.
Sam
New York, United States
17/D-27
Feb 08, 2007
12:17 AM
let us not talk about tax-payers having greatest rights to question what iit-ans do with their lives. iit-ans are not accountable to their questions, the govt is which makes the policy of funding the iits.
tax payers would be more inclined to question the obc quota policy which directly uses tax money.
chester pester
timbaktoo, timbaktoo
18/D-22
May 02, 2007
12:18 AM
Question doesnt lies behind the tag name of IITians but the answer is behind the usability of blackboard. It is not surprising if I say that handful of IITans can not reform the present social and technological divisions with respect to present India because IITians have tuned with such curriculum which can not provide scientists who can work on Indian nuclear vision or space technology. It is a factory outlet of engineers who are moving into IT/Telco service industry, which is nothing but an illusion for an imagination for seeing India as superpower in many terms. Where is India’s manufacturing units ,production houses? Whole industrial sector is manipulated and monopolized in such a way that ; small sectors are able to pace with them. We defend ourselves that we have our own ideas, which can excel; provided the necessary opportunity. But whole financing/banking sector is maneuver with such schemes in which they always intended to fool customers with some hidden costs and this is our MBA wallas are studying in this industry. They are studying for selling credit cards and making plans.
And I think people and these industrial trends are whole sole responsible for this because they are nurturing their profit only, they are not seeking future of India in it.
I’m not satisfied with this kind of briefing of such policies and problems but it is quite ubiquitous to watch such problems on some forums of social discussions.
Now question is; what is the solution?
I think we need to reform and restructure our basic education system, primary system of education because it is the system or interface with which young minds interacts and which is not possible without the intervention of government and definitely industry has to play a strong and supportive role in this regard. Because industry is creating employment; so they cannot be ignored. But they are creating wealth and wealth of information; they have their own social network of people, they have their won independent systems and human resources. So Industry, government and people can strategize the future not of tomorrow but of India in 2020.

www.pradeepsharma.info
Pradeep Sharma
Mumbai, India
19/D-24
May 21, 2007
12:19 AM
I do not agree with Dunu Roy. I am an IITian myself and started my career working in the Indian NGO sector, helping farmers with small loans etc and then writing about environmental issues with Anil Agarwal. I think Dunu can claim the high moral ground because he gave his life for rural development. But what is the end result Dunu? Has it done any good? Is there a model that can replicate your success from one village to a national or even regional level? Do the villagers even care? I remember the village folk loved our "projects" and it was because that gave them access to the outside world and connections. They cared two hoots about the biogas plant that we wanted to instal.

I think the IITians who have worked for
Microsoft and Silicon Valley have done a world of good. I do not want to make value judgements - each group has made major contributions. We have to assume that every human being is rational, even the do-gooders among the IIT community. If they do their work honestly, and serve the community whether it is to bring out a new version of Windows or a non-smoking chulha,there is no basis to make comparisons.

I think India is now part of a global economy, and whether an IITian stays in India or in California, our country benefits from their activities. I do not think brain drain is a losing proposition. It is better that an IITian thrives in a foreign country than wastes his or life stagnating in an environment (30 years ago) when the country was backward in its quality of science and technology. As time goes by, this will become less and less relevant and as you can already see, many bright minds are now staying back and have no interest in migrating overseas.
ujjayant chakravorty
Atlanta, United States
20/D-28
May 21, 2007
12:20 AM
IItians are not meant to run solve the caste system, remove inequalities and end crime. For gods sake they are just engineers. They are meant to understand how technology works and through that understanding create economic value for themselves, their families and to the society in general. The only perhaps serious question is whether they create better value for society by remaining in India or by emigrating aborad.
Kiran
Hyderabad, India
21/D-107
Sep 11, 2013
12:36 PM

Completely agree with Dunu Roy.IIT was created to create scientists,technologists & Researchers to serve country to catchup with Industrial Revolution in which India was left behind due to British Rule.Intellect that IITians boast of just made them Baniya instead of Engineers.They took advantage of Tax payers money,studied for cheap & ran to foreign shores or MBA business to serve thier Masters & their selfish existence.

They are so cunning & corrupt that they join organization after B.Tech using IIT's brand on hefty salary but give nothing to organization in return,instead prepare for CAT,GMAT,CFA, GRE etc.And people from lesser salary & lesser Brand have to do their work.I have seen many Intelligent IITians who can't  even do Programming properly but they deamand top appraisal rating,recommendation letters & keep on bootlicking for Business Analysts or Onsite opportunity.

60+ years of IIT's,no metionable inventions or Research by IITians.Inspite of getting best brains none of IIT's figure even in top 100 world ranking.

They are just slaves of their Masters & their Greed like a Donkey,hence don't deserve subsidy in fee or respect for fellow Indians as their contribution to Science or country is worthless/minuscule.So Instead of Criticizing Dunu,do some self introspection.

Mac
Mumbai, India
22/D-166
Sep 11, 2013
05:56 PM

The situation seems to be, that education is a process that doesn't increase value, but decreases value. Manufacturing is creating needless production, perhaps, and it seems, that the people who use processes, don't create the concept. This is what our education system seems to promote in the whole system. The cost of production is more than the selling price in the broad view.

Aditya Mookerjee
Belgaum, India
23/D-19
Sep 12, 2013
03:37 AM

Nehru created IITs with the expectation that the graduates from the temples of technology would join the public sector manufacturing companies to spearhead technological progress of the nation. Public sector companies instead were run by the bureaucrats and politicians accumulating huge losses to the exchequer, while taxpayer subsidized IIT education gave passport to better paying jobs to its alumni in India and overseas - mostly in multinationals and private sector companies.

IITs have admitted some of the brightest minds through very  tough and competitive admission test. The graduates have done well in their professional career  in India and abroad. Reputation of IIT alumni enhanced IIT's brand as premier engineering institutions. Yet IITs have not been recognized globally for the quality of research of IIT faculty. Nor could they take pre eminent role in  leading technological progress of the nation. You can question whether the government should still be funding IITs if their original mission was never accomplished.  In this regard, IITs are not the only institutes, there are several engineering colleges that are funded by the government. Should the government subsidize undergraduate engineering education? Should the tax payers pay stipend to students pursuing a post graduate technological education? Given the pathetic track record of a large number of private professional colleges that charge huge fees, provide low quality faculty and lousy infrastructure, the government's withdrawal from higher education will have to be gradual.

There is room for a healthy debate. But bashing IITians alone is often out of sheer jealousy. If I fail to qualify in IIT JEE and I see its alumni in lucrative professional career, I will bring in all the issues to bash IIT graduates. ( MBA bashing is quite common everywhere and in America graduates of Ivy League schools are bashed often by those who never went there).  Every engineering graduate from India from government funded colleges is recipient of tax payer funded subsidy. That should not mean that they would only work in villages developing technology for the rural poor. ( Don't be so stupid as to believe that the rural poor want technology for the bullock cart and they do not like computers and cellphones.)

Manufacturing sector in India has suffered because of faulty government policies that repelled private investments.  Why did multinationals set up high tech manufacturing facilities in China and in East Asian countries including Vietnam, but not in India? Don't blame IITians for that.  

DC
NEW YORK, United States
24/D-34
Sep 12, 2013
08:34 AM

Response to post # 23: There is one All India Institute of Medical Sciences, and many more I. I. T.'s. What is more relevant, employment in the health sector, or other tech. sectors, in your opinion? I personally think, that one A. I. I. M. S. was made an institution, and remains one, as the institute is of paramount importance to civilian interests. The second most regarded medical facility in India is the military medical facility in Pune, Maharashtra, India, and is run by military medical authorities.

The I. I. T.'s are comparable to the A. I. I. M. S., but what is the relevance to the current situation? The graduates of I. I. T., went abroad, because there were no jobs that they saw employed their abilities appropriately. Also, when new abilities are innovated by the I. I. T.'s, the process is an innovation due to conservation of certain resources, time which is also a resource among them. The resources aren't being conserved, in India, but costs are increasing due to over utilization of resources. I don't say I am right, but my perception is not more than what it is, nor less. It seems, the best educational institutions run on currency, and how currency funds them. These institutions have imparted an education, that has undervalued instruction, in general, both monetarily, and in material, as more manufactured material has led to the undervalue of currency to perception.

Money has no value, but the exchange value. We see money overvalued and undervalued, when no such perception is best, perhaps. Just off the record, I saw a B. B. C. documentary on the Roman Empire. Apparently, the prosperous city state, made the Roman Army very morale relevant, and the army had many defeats, before they expanded the borders.

Aditya Mookerjee
Belgaum, India
25/D-52
Sep 12, 2013
09:23 AM

DC >> Manufacturing sector in India has suffered because of faulty government policies that repelled private investments. Why did multinationals set up high tech manufacturing facilities in China and in East Asian countries including Vietnam, but not in India? Don't blame IITians for that.

To elaborate bit further - manufacturing post 2000 has not come to India because we lack the infrastructure. Vajpayee kind of realised this when he tried to bring golden quadrilateral and reformed power sector. But the UPA and its dynasty believe in only charity and making us a nation of beggars so infrastructure has taken a back seat. Take the example of the Delhi-Mumbai corridor, where a dedicated rail track to be laid to link the places in between. The project started in 2004-05, still nothing much happend in ground. This is why India is not able to make the cellphones and iPads  and LED TVs that are made in China or Malaysia. And our intellectuals who use thse products are not bothered, but rather are interested in right to eat biryani and right to drink wine act that will be enacted in UPA3 government.

Ramki_Uncensored
Delhi, India
26/D-176
Sep 13, 2013
09:35 PM

Aditya Mookerjee
Belgaum, India
 

It's impossible to comprehend your posts- the meandering prose expresses several disjointed ideas.

I believe the value of higher education lies in developing  citizens  trained in different disciplines that need specialized skills. The value creation is how you impart a set of skills and a process of thinking  into the students who can carry them forward and hone them further after graduation. That's not all. Since human learning is ever dynamic and newer discoveries continue to revise our previous knowldge ,the curriculum needs to be updated from time to time and the teachers need to refresh their knowledge. Instituions of learning also generate new ideas through their research . Obviously, you need quality faculty, infrastructure for modern teaching and research, always up to date curriculum and disciplined processes to build all institutions of higher learning.  And all these cost money. In India the government is subsidizing the lion's share of the cost,  That's why you can live with the ignorance that either quality education does not cost much or privately financed higher education is run on money alone.

Your understanding about manufacturing and education needs to change. Human progress over the centuries from cave dwelling to modern housing, from dark nights to electricity illuminated evenings, from hard physical work to comfortable living, from commuting on foot to space travel, from dying young to living longer- would never have been achieved without the human quest for adding more to their contemporary knowledge and developing newer things for even better quality of living. It is the collected human endeavour of billions of humans over the centuries (despite the fact that every human is mortal) to accumulate their knowledge that benefits generations of humans. The value of the education lies in applying the latest knowledge in improving human quality of living. If like you (and the anti-consumerist leftist intellectuals) all other humans believed that more manufacturing is unnecessary because it leads to more use of resources then the human society wouldn't have advanced across generations. On the contrary, newer ideas about renewable energy, alternative sources of production, sustainable manufacturing, more efficient and leaner manufacturing process , non-polluting production methods etc. are contributions of our ever expanding knowledge and education.  Innovations indeed lead to routine manufacturing processes, but the innovations do not stop and therefore the processes also need to change. Education creates value continuously, contrary to what you understand.

Your comparison of IIT with AIIMS is totally misplaced. Scores of doctors educated in AIIMS and other medical colleges in India have settled overseas. Also a doctor makes a lot more money than an engineer in USA. So the assumption about doctors choosing to make no money from a noble profession and only engineers hanker after money is foolish.  More Given milllions of poor patients, how many of them can be treated at the hospital facilities at AIIMS or by AIIMS trained doctors elsewhere?

DC
NEW YORK, United States
27/D-30
Sep 14, 2013
08:20 AM

DC,

It's impossible to comprehend your posts- the meandering prose expresses several disjointed ideas. (To Aditya Mookerjee)

You're not the only one.

Bonita
Chennai, India
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