BOOK REVIEWS
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Chanakya Returns by Timeri N. Murari
Chanakya returns, but unlike Twain’s Yankee, is baffled, wooden and without much agency
Reviewed by Vijay Nambisan
Magazine | Sep 22, 2014
Indians At Herod’s Gate: A Jerusalem Tale by Navtej Sarna
Travel writing with a difference: weaving an extraordinary narrative on an unusual theme.
Reviewed by Smita Tewari Jassal
Magazine | Sep 22, 2014
The Saffron Tide: The Rise Of The BJP by Kingshuk Nag
More hackwork than scholarly investigation and analysis, Kingshuk Nag’s book gets its reading of the Modi era wrong, investing it with the weightiness of a shift in polity
Reviewed by Sudheendra Kulkarni
Magazine | Sep 15, 2014
Vaadivaasal by C.S. Chellappa & N. Kalyan Raman Dweepa by Na. D’Souza & Susheela Punitha Tyanantar by Saniya & Maya Pandit Moogavani Pillanagrovi by Kesava Reddy Sheet Sahasik Hemantolok by Nabaneeta Dev Sen & Tutun Mukherjee Jeevichirikkunnavarkku Vendiyulla Oppees by Johny Miranda & Sajai Jose
Six novellas from Telugu, Kannada, Bengali, Tamil, Malayalam and Marathi literature offer a glimpse into different Indian realities for a bhasha-deprived generation
Reviewed by Chandan Gowda
Magazine | Sep 01, 2014
Night Flight To Dungavel by Peter Padfield
A scholarly investigation into the top-sec­ret visit of Rudolf Hess, Hitler’s second-in-command, to Britain in 1941.
Reviewed by Anvar Alikhan
Magazine | Sep 01, 2014
A Town Like Ours by Kavery Nambisan
A village—and its quirky, humdrum lives—is dragged into townhood. Nambisan’s scalpel probes every growth.
Reviewed by Manjul Bajaj
Magazine | Aug 25, 2014
In The Shadow Of The Leaves by Anjana Basu
Not a book to just skip through. You are so spellbound that you just don’t want to miss a word
Reviewed by Paro Anand
Magazine | Aug 25, 2014
Angaaray by Angarey: Nine Stories And A Play by
Two translations of a seminal short story collection— experimental in form and style—that set north India aflame
Reviewed by Daisy Rockwell
Magazine | Aug 18, 2014
The Sleepwalker’s Guide To Dancing by Mira Jacob
Hailed as the new Jhumpa Lahiri, Jacob soars with a voice entirely her own, less bleak and more vibrant.
Reviewed by Neha Bhatt
Magazine | Aug 18, 2014
Call for Transnational Jihad: Lashkar-e-Taiba 1985-2014 by Arif Jamal
One of the most detailed accounts of the doctrine(s), strategy, tactics and goals of the Pakistani Salafi jihadist enterprise Markaz Dawa’-wal-Irshad (MID), the terrorist outfit Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) and its parent outfit Jama’t-ud-Dawa (JuD)
Reviewed by Mohammad Taqi
Web | Aug 06, 2014
The Lives Of Others by Neel Mukherjee
A large family, a ravaged peasantry, a Calcutta mansion play roles in a novel set in Bengal cowering under Naxalism
Reviewed by Anjana Basu
Magazine | Aug 04, 2014
Smash and Grab: Annexation Of Sikkim by Sunanda K. Datta-Ray
At best a historical novel rather than a serious historical narrative.
Reviewed by Ranjit Gupta
Magazine | Aug 04, 2014
The Gypsy Goddess by Meena Kandasamy
Spare, incandescently passionate, straining conventions, Meena Kandasamy reignites the Kilvenmany massacre
Reviewed by Urvashi Butalia
Magazine | Jul 28, 2014
Literary Miniatures by Florence Noiville & Terersa L. Fagan
A real delight to read with unexpected, tangential detours, an ear for the uncanny and a distilled, bare-boned way of writing
Reviewed by Satish Padmanabhan
Magazine | Jul 28, 2014
The Small Wild Goose Pagoda (An Almanack) by I. Allan Sealy
Sealy doesn’t just build a scaled-down 8th century Chinese pagoda in Doon. His almanack is a fragile ecosystem itself.
Reviewed by Anjana Basu
Magazine | Jul 21, 2014
Engglishhh: Fictional Dispatches From A Hyperreal Nation by Altaf Tyrewala
If this blundering pastiche can pass for a book review, then mimesis is a form of subversive flattery
Reviewed by S.B. Easwaran
Magazine | Jul 21, 2014
File Room by Dayanita Singh
File Room is subtly perceptive and variously tactile. Its images of paper-laden spaces speak of absent narratives.
Reviewed by Sudeep Sen
Magazine | Jul 14, 2014
No Country by Kalyan Ray
If the early cha­pters are like riding a whirlwind, what follows is like being bec­almed mid sea.
Reviewed by Sathya Saran
Magazine | Jul 14, 2014
Indian National Congress and The Struggle For Freedom 1885-1947 by Amales Tripathi
Acknowledging subaltern studies, the Cambridge school and the Communists, this monumental history establishes the primacy of the INC to the freedom struggle
Reviewed by Mani Shankar Aiyar
Magazine | Jun 30, 2014
Reading Rituparno by Shoma A. Chatterji
A matrix of themes bind a well-researched study of Rituparno’s films. Missing beats are drowned in praise.
Reviewed by Anjana Basu
Magazine | Jun 16, 2014

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