Inzamam-ul Haq
The Gentle Giant of Multan wanted to look in on his native Haryana village, but was refused permission.
COMMENTS PRINT
Special Issue: Partition  Partition
At six, she witnessed the slaughter of her family. In 1984, she relived the trauma.
Jeet Behn
Two Hindu families, who never left Dhaka in '47, were hit by the Ayodhya spillover.
P.K. Chakravarty
A Mohajir in Sindh, uprooted from UP, she finds no respite from a harsh, blood-shot life.
Naeema Begum
After two years as Pakistani citizen, she realised she was differently acculturised.
Begum Para
The classical maestro opted for Pakistan but admits he paid a price for it: his music.
Ustad Fateh Ali Khan
His Pakistani family got Mohajir-ised; he, over here, got marginalised.
Ali Sardar Jafri
The dancer-actress is happy to be in Lahore, says Muslims are kings there.
Uzra Bhatt
Emigre poetry is laden with nostalgia, he says, suggesting a turf for cultural dialogue. More Stories
Kaifi Azmi
Gifted with a syncretic outlook, he decided to go west when all friends, with whom he discussed poetry, left.
Intezar Hussein
A refugee from Calcutta's legal street, he was sensitised to the minority predicament.
Kemaluddin Hossain
Haunted by bleak images of riots, famine and migration, he took refuge in literature.
Sunil Gangopadhyay
He saw mud, massacre and betrayal in '47; yet 71 was just duty, not poetic justice.
J.S. Aurora
He came with the deathly 'Karachi Cologne' on him; joined Edwina's rescue team.
From UP's Azamgarh, he called democratic polls after Zia's death; yet retains a sense of dissatisfaction
Fundamentalist by 'birth, instinct, training', his aggressive motto is 'Next year, Lahore'.
They've come very far from the gutter that life threw them into; but his mother still calls Delhiites 'Hindustanis'.
Angry with a dream gone sour, Pakistan's 'Father Teresa' is still fired with optimism.
He hoped for a Lahore, India, address. And fled only when history dictated otherwise.
Though relieved to leave Lahore, she missed its life of the mind. Delhi was a village.
Now head of state, in 1947 he was one among the dispossessed millions.
At 11, torn from his family, he fled East Bengal with Rs 30, borrowed from a Muslim retainer
Special Issue: Partition
These are the stories of women, children, everyman; of the pain and trauma of being uprooted--an account of our holocaust
Sunil Mehra, Arshad Mahmud, Azhar Abbas, Mazhar Zaidi, Pritha Sen

IN India to play for his country, ace Pakistani batsman, Inzamamul-Haq, 23, also known as the Gentle Giant of Multan, is emotional. At Mohali, his eyes brim over in front of television cameras as he expresses his wish to go to Hansi in Haryana where his family migrated from in 1947. "I have to go there. I promised my father I'd bring him pictures. We have no relatives there but we did have a haveli. Dad said it was near a mazaar." In the Taj palace lobby in Delhi, he asks anxiously, "do you think anyone would remember my grandfather Pirzada Zia-ul-Haq by name there? Are there any Muslims left there anymore? Do you think they might have changed the name of the locality? Dad tells me it was called Pirzadgan. Others called it mohalla Moghalpura." The Pakistani cricket board did not permit him to go.

He was not the only one that wanted to go. His captain Rameez Raja, too, wanted to visit his inlaws' relatives in Kamal, his own folks in Jaipur. "I'm from Lahore. My mother-in-law is from Delhi, my father-in-law from Karnal. Don't know about the wife. I've hopefully picked up some of Delhi's famous tehzeeb (courtesy) from her," he says, smiling shyly. "I would be happy to meet my in-laws in Karnal but where is the time or the permission?" Teammate Ijaz Ahmed nods along. Contrary to media reports, he too could not meet cousins in Jalandhar for the same reason.

Cricketers are celebrities. Their grief is public. So are the amends that public relations-conscious governments sometimes make for them. But for every known Rameez, Ijaz and 'Inzi' there are a thousand eponymous ones whose anguish will never be aired, whose wishes will never be fulfilled, to whom concessions will never be made. For they are nameless, faceless. Just one of the many that lay siege at the Pakistan embassy in Delhi, the Indian embassy in Islamabad to beg for visas that are sometimes granted, often refused.

Like permission was. To Inzi. The gentle giant with the gentler heart, whose eagerness shone like a neon sign as he asked team manager Naseem, "you think I can go, Naseembhai? These people here tell me Hansi is just a day trip away. Do you think I can go over, Naseembhai?" It's a question countless Inzis have been asking their respective governments over and over again in the last 50 years.

COMMENTS PRINT
At six, she witnessed the slaughter of her family. In 1984, she relived the trauma.
Jeet Behn
Two Hindu families, who never left Dhaka in '47, were hit by the Ayodhya spillover.
P.K. Chakravarty
A Mohajir in Sindh, uprooted from UP, she finds no respite from a harsh, blood-shot life.
Naeema Begum
After two years as Pakistani citizen, she realised she was differently acculturised.
Begum Para
The classical maestro opted for Pakistan but admits he paid a price for it: his music.
Ustad Fateh Ali Khan
His Pakistani family got Mohajir-ised; he, over here, got marginalised.
Ali Sardar Jafri
The dancer-actress is happy to be in Lahore, says Muslims are kings there.
Uzra Bhatt
Emigre poetry is laden with nostalgia, he says, suggesting a turf for cultural dialogue. More Stories
Kaifi Azmi
Gifted with a syncretic outlook, he decided to go west when all friends, with whom he discussed poetry, left.
Intezar Hussein
A refugee from Calcutta's legal street, he was sensitised to the minority predicament.
Kemaluddin Hossain
Haunted by bleak images of riots, famine and migration, he took refuge in literature.
Sunil Gangopadhyay
He saw mud, massacre and betrayal in '47; yet 71 was just duty, not poetic justice.
J.S. Aurora
He came with the deathly 'Karachi Cologne' on him; joined Edwina's rescue team.
From UP's Azamgarh, he called democratic polls after Zia's death; yet retains a sense of dissatisfaction
Fundamentalist by 'birth, instinct, training', his aggressive motto is 'Next year, Lahore'.
They've come very far from the gutter that life threw them into; but his mother still calls Delhiites 'Hindustanis'.
Angry with a dream gone sour, Pakistan's 'Father Teresa' is still fired with optimism.
He hoped for a Lahore, India, address. And fled only when history dictated otherwise.
Though relieved to leave Lahore, she missed its life of the mind. Delhi was a village.
Now head of state, in 1947 he was one among the dispossessed millions.
At 11, torn from his family, he fled East Bengal with Rs 30, borrowed from a Muslim retainer
Special Issue: Partition
These are the stories of women, children, everyman; of the pain and trauma of being uprooted--an account of our holocaust
Sunil Mehra, Arshad Mahmud, Azhar Abbas, Mazhar Zaidi, Pritha Sen

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