Tanveer Shahzad
Gen. Mirza Aslam Beg
From UP's Azamgarh, he called democratic polls after Zia's death; yet retains a sense of dissatisfaction
COMMENTS PRINT
Special Issue: Partition  Partition
At six, she witnessed the slaughter of her family. In 1984, she relived the trauma.
Jeet Behn
Two Hindu families, who never left Dhaka in '47, were hit by the Ayodhya spillover.
P.K. Chakravarty
A Mohajir in Sindh, uprooted from UP, she finds no respite from a harsh, blood-shot life.
Naeema Begum
After two years as Pakistani citizen, she realised she was differently acculturised.
Begum Para
The classical maestro opted for Pakistan but admits he paid a price for it: his music.
Ustad Fateh Ali Khan
His Pakistani family got Mohajir-ised; he, over here, got marginalised.
Ali Sardar Jafri
The dancer-actress is happy to be in Lahore, says Muslims are kings there.
Uzra Bhatt
Emigre poetry is laden with nostalgia, he says, suggesting a turf for cultural dialogue. More Stories
Kaifi Azmi
Gifted with a syncretic outlook, he decided to go west when all friends, with whom he discussed poetry, left.
Intezar Hussein
A refugee from Calcutta's legal street, he was sensitised to the minority predicament.
Kemaluddin Hossain
The Gentle Giant of Multan wanted to look in on his native Haryana village, but was refused permission.
Inzamam-ul Haq
Haunted by bleak images of riots, famine and migration, he took refuge in literature.
Sunil Gangopadhyay
He saw mud, massacre and betrayal in '47; yet 71 was just duty, not poetic justice.
J.S. Aurora
He came with the deathly 'Karachi Cologne' on him; joined Edwina's rescue team.
Fundamentalist by 'birth, instinct, training', his aggressive motto is 'Next year, Lahore'.
They've come very far from the gutter that life threw them into; but his mother still calls Delhiites 'Hindustanis'.
Angry with a dream gone sour, Pakistan's 'Father Teresa' is still fired with optimism.
He hoped for a Lahore, India, address. And fled only when history dictated otherwise.
Though relieved to leave Lahore, she missed its life of the mind. Delhi was a village.
Now head of state, in 1947 he was one among the dispossessed millions.
At 11, torn from his family, he fled East Bengal with Rs 30, borrowed from a Muslim retainer
Special Issue: Partition
These are the stories of women, children, everyman; of the pain and trauma of being uprooted--an account of our holocaust
Sunil Mehra, Arshad Mahmud, Azhar Abbas, Mazhar Zaidi, Pritha Sen

FIFTY years ago, as a student of Shiblee College in the small UP town of Azamgarh, I sought revenge when someone came and told me that a Hindu politician had beaten up a member of our hockey team. Egged on by a mob of students, I beat up the politician at a public meeting. Then came the Partition. I set sail for Karachi from Bombay in '49 after my graduation. My brother was already in the Pakistan Army, so it didn't take me long to decide on a career. I joined the Pakistan Military Academy in '50 and was commissioned into the Baloch Regiment in '52. It was a smooth ride to the top, to GHQ Rawalpindi.

I took over as army chief after Zia's death in '88. We were returning to Islamabad from a meet at Bahawalpur. Zia and nine top army officers were in a C-130; I was flying in another plane. I saw the plane crash in front of my eyes. I soon announced democratic elections, paving the way for Benazir Bhutto to come to power.

Memories of '47? I came to Pakistan with a lot of hope. It was my dream country but after 41 years of my service, I've come to the conclusion that we have not delivered to the people. That is the reason why I have decided to join politics. I launched the Awami Kiadat Party in 1993.

There have been only two parties in the political history of Pakistan which actually represented the people. And both were rejected by the country. One was the Awami League which was marginalised in such a manner that it drifted away from the country. The other is the Mohajir Qaumi Movement in urban Sindh. The problem of the people of Pakistan are economic in nature and nothing else. Despite being a Mohajir, I never faced any hostility in the military. I blame the people who came over (from India) for this discrimination they constantly harp on. They (the immigrants) never really tried to adjust here. They thought they were superior and asked for a different treatment from the locals here. If you are adopting a country you have to behave like one of them.

I adjusted to life here and I learnt this lesson in my college days in Azamgarh itself. Despite the fact that we were a minority there, by putting up a united front, we made our presence felt and achieved our goals.

Read More In:

Section:
COMMENTS PRINT
At six, she witnessed the slaughter of her family. In 1984, she relived the trauma.
Jeet Behn
Two Hindu families, who never left Dhaka in '47, were hit by the Ayodhya spillover.
P.K. Chakravarty
A Mohajir in Sindh, uprooted from UP, she finds no respite from a harsh, blood-shot life.
Naeema Begum
After two years as Pakistani citizen, she realised she was differently acculturised.
Begum Para
The classical maestro opted for Pakistan but admits he paid a price for it: his music.
Ustad Fateh Ali Khan
His Pakistani family got Mohajir-ised; he, over here, got marginalised.
Ali Sardar Jafri
The dancer-actress is happy to be in Lahore, says Muslims are kings there.
Uzra Bhatt
Emigre poetry is laden with nostalgia, he says, suggesting a turf for cultural dialogue. More Stories
Kaifi Azmi
Gifted with a syncretic outlook, he decided to go west when all friends, with whom he discussed poetry, left.
Intezar Hussein
A refugee from Calcutta's legal street, he was sensitised to the minority predicament.
Kemaluddin Hossain
The Gentle Giant of Multan wanted to look in on his native Haryana village, but was refused permission.
Inzamam-ul Haq
Haunted by bleak images of riots, famine and migration, he took refuge in literature.
Sunil Gangopadhyay
He saw mud, massacre and betrayal in '47; yet 71 was just duty, not poetic justice.
J.S. Aurora
He came with the deathly 'Karachi Cologne' on him; joined Edwina's rescue team.
Fundamentalist by 'birth, instinct, training', his aggressive motto is 'Next year, Lahore'.
They've come very far from the gutter that life threw them into; but his mother still calls Delhiites 'Hindustanis'.
Angry with a dream gone sour, Pakistan's 'Father Teresa' is still fired with optimism.
He hoped for a Lahore, India, address. And fled only when history dictated otherwise.
Though relieved to leave Lahore, she missed its life of the mind. Delhi was a village.
Now head of state, in 1947 he was one among the dispossessed millions.
At 11, torn from his family, he fled East Bengal with Rs 30, borrowed from a Muslim retainer
Special Issue: Partition
These are the stories of women, children, everyman; of the pain and trauma of being uprooted--an account of our holocaust
Sunil Mehra, Arshad Mahmud, Azhar Abbas, Mazhar Zaidi, Pritha Sen

Translate into:
 


Post a Comment
You are not logged in, please log in or register
If you wish your letter to be considered for publication in the print magazine, we request you to use a proper name, with full postal address - you could still maintain your anonymity, but please desist from using unpublishable sobriquets and handles

ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SUBSCRIBE | ADVERTISING RATES | COPYRIGHT & DISCLAIMER | COMMENTS POLICY

OUTLOOK TOPICS:    a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z  0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9   
Or just type in a few initial letters of a topic: